IL VIKKI VUKELICH: Missing from Glenwood, IL - 21 February 1991 - Age 32

Akoya

Well-known member


Vicki L. Vukelich went missing from Glenwood, Cook County, on February 24, 1991. Vukelich was last seen on February 24, 1991 in her home in Glenwood, Illinois. A witness saw figures in a car at the Vukelich house on the night of her disappearance and heard a woman's voice screaming, 'Help me, please help me.' The car took off, and Vukelich was reported missing the next day.


Media - http://crimewatchers.net/index.php?...od-illinois-since-21-february-1991-age-32.92/


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Akoya

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http://doenetwork.org/cases/1150dfil.html

Date Of Birth: January 6, 1959
Age at Time of Disappearance: 32 years old
Height and Weight at Time of Disappearance: 5'1"-5'4"; 110 lbs.
Distinguishing Characteristics: White female. Blonde hair; blue eyes.
Marks, Scars: Three piercings in left ear, five piercings in right ear, surgical scar from Cesarean section on abdomen. Wears clear contacts and glasses with plastic frames.
Clothing/Jewelry: Possibly wearing night clothes which would be a long sleeve shirt, sweatpants, and socks. Usually wears gold hoop earrings, diamond earrings, and ruby earrings, gold necklace with a "cross" pendant, gold wedding ring on left ring finger.
Dentals: Crooked upper and lower teeth.
Alias: Vicki

Circumstances of Disappearance
Vukelich was last seen on February 23, 1991 in her home in Glenwood, Illinois.

A witness saw figures in a car at the Vukelich house on the night of her disappearance and heard a woman's voice screaming, 'Help me, please help me.' The car took off, and Vukelich was reported missing the next day.

Vukelich and her husband were going through a rocky marriage, with Vukelich winning an order of protection against him in 1988 after she told police he tried to strangle her and threatened to kill her. She filed for divorce, then attempted to reconcile with her husband, but he allegedly continued to beat her through late 1989.
Then her husband began accusing Vukelich of attacking him. He accused her of throwing a cup of hot coffee at him in August 1990. And she was arrested in November 1990 when her husband called the police complaining that she hit and bit him. A police officer accused Vukelich of resisting arrest. An arrest warrant was issued for her after she disappeared.

A new garage floor was built, new carpeting installed and the house sold shortly after Vukelich disappeared.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
Details of Disappearance

Vikki's husband, David Vukelich, says he last saw her on February 23, 1991 in their home in the 500 block of Tulip Drive in Glenwood, Illinois. David stated he and Vikki argued about going to a party the night of her disappearance. He went to bed and she slept on the couch. When David woke up the following morning, there was an empty glass of wine in the living room and Vikki was gone. $8,000 was also missing from the home, but Vikki left behind her clothes, her shoes, her eyeglasses, and her two daughters.
David and Vikki married in 1986. They had a troubled relationship and the police had been called to their house several times and arrested both of them due to domestic disputes. All the charges were dismissed each time. Shortly before her disappearance, Vikki told her friends she was going to divorce David. She had filed for divorce twice previously, in 1988 and 1989, but never went through with the whole process. She said she dropped the divorce suits because was not sure she could support herself financially without David's help, but she took a second job shortly before her disappearance and told her friends she was "really going to do it this time."

David did not report his wife missing; a friend of Vikki's filed a report on February 28. Neighbors stated that shortly after Vikki vanished, David did cement work in his driveway and garage and removed carpeting from the home. He told Vikki's older daughter not to go into the basement. Two months after his wife's disappearance, David filed for divorce. During the proceedings, he testified that Vikki frequently left him without warning for periods of time and would then return with no explanation as to where she had been. The couple's divorce was finalized in August 1991. David remarried in 1994, but his second wife died, apparently of breast cancer, a short time later. He remarried again in 2002. He moved out of his and Vikki's home seven months after her disappearance and now lives in Dyer, Indiana.

In 2003, authorities searched the house the Vukeliches lived in when Vikki vanished. They also exhumed David's second wife's body to look for signs of foul play. It is not known what, if any, evidence was discovered as a result of these efforts. Vikki's older daughter was interviewed by investigators and media at that time and stated that while her mother occasionally left the family home for short periods after fighting with David, she always kept in contact with her children.

Although David is considered the prime suspect in Vikki's disappearance, he has never been charged in connection with it. Vikki's case remains unsolved. She owned a beauty parlor in South Holland, Illinois in 1991.

http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/v/v ... vikki.html
 

Akoya

Well-known member
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/loca ... hshore-hed

New drive to solve '91 disappearance in Glenwood

By Jo Napolitano
Tribune staff reporter
Published March 10, 2006


Jill Crawford, 27, never believed the story that her mother had abandoned her and her half-sister, Ashley, 15 years ago.

Vikki Vukelich was a good mother who would never leave her girls, Crawford said. Besides, her clothes, shoes, contacts and glasses were all untouched inside her Glenwood home when she was alleged to have left the night of Feb. 23, 1991, walking toward the highway.

Vukelich, a petite, blonde hairdresser with a wide smile, was 32 years old when she disappeared.

Her family announced Thursday that it is offering a $200,000 reward--money donated from family, friends and area businesses--for information leading to her whereabouts.

Crawford, who was 12 when Vukelich disappeared, was her mother's protector, she said. As a child, she would sit at the top of the staircase inside the family home, making her presence known when she heard fighting escalate between her mother and her new husband.

"Mom, are you OK?" she would ask.

In July 2003, authorities excavated portions of the family's old home in the 500 block of Tulip Drive, searching for clues in the concrete and dirt. They were tight-lipped about what they found.

Police would not disclose any new information on the investigation Thursday, and no one has been charged.

"I miss her every hour, every single day," Crawford said. "I miss her voice, her laugh. Sometimes I think I can't make it through another day, another year. My mom just didn't vanish from thin air. Someone, somewhere, knows something."

Vukelich has been absent from every milestone in her daughter's life--her high school graduation, her wedding, the birth of her first child.

Crawford's stepfather lives in Dyer, Ind., and was remarried after her mother disappeared. That wife died of breast cancer in September 1994, although her body was later exhumed as part of an investigation into her death. No charges were filed in Mary "Susie" Jonker-Vukelich's death, officials said.

Vikki Vukelich became friends with her neighbor, Mary Prskalo, in the early '80s when they were both single mothers living only yards apart. Their children were playmates, and the women developed a strong bond, talking for hours about their families and their plans.

Vukelich told Prskalo that she feared for her life. When Vukelich attended a murdered woman's funeral, she told Prskalo, "That could be me."

Prskalo said that when she heard her friend went missing, she believed she was dead. Now, 15 years later, Prskalo said it is her duty to keep searching. Vukelich told her years ago that if anything ever happened to her, she knew Prskalo "wouldn't let it go."

Crime Stoppers also is involved, said George McDade, president of the Cook County division. The group is offering a $1,000 reward for info.

"If Vikki is alive, someone needs to pick up the phone, call Crime Stoppers, and tell us where she is," he said. If someone knows she is dead, that person needs to come forward, he said.

Crime Stoppers can be reached at 800-535-STOP. Anyone with information also can call Crawford's private investigator, John Frycek, at 800-459-2185, ext. 2001.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2003 ... nwood-home


Missing-person case revived 12 years later
Authorities comb Glenwood home


July 09, 2003|By Stanley Ziemba and Karen Mellen, Tribune staff reporters.
State police, FBI agents and local authorities excavated the crawl space of a Glenwood home Tuesday in search of the remains of a woman who disappeared from the house 12 years ago.

Vikki Lynn Vukelich was reported missing in February 1991 when she was 32. A former police official and neighbors said her husband reportedly told people the hairdresser and mother of two had taken thousands of dollars and run off.

But friends and some police officials never believed that Vukelich would leave her two daughters, who were about 12 and 4.

"From the first moment, we knew something was up," said Robert Considine, a Hinsdale resident and former boyfriend of Vukelich.

The two lived together for four years before Vukelich married her husband. Considine and Vukelich had a daughter, Jill, 24.

Glenwood Police Chief Kevin Welsh would not say if anything was uncovered Monday night--when a search of the gray frame, split-level house in the 500 block of Tulip Drive began--or on Tuesday. He said police and FBI would continue the search Wednesday.

"This is part of an ongoing, multi-jurisdictional investigation that began in 1991 when Vikki Vukelich was reported missing," said Welsh, who has been Glenwood's police chief for two years.

Welsh added that though a search for the woman's remains is part of the investigation, "at this point, this is still a missing-person case." He declined to comment on whether police were questioning anyone in connection with the case.

Police waited 12 years to conduct an intensive search of the house, Welsh said, because new investigative technologies improve the chances of finding evidence inside the building.

He denied that police were tipped to the possibility of finding Vukelich's remains or other evidence inside the house.

"It wasn't a tip that led us here, just good, solid police work," he said.

Darnell Posey, who rented a room in the house from the owner, said state police and FBI agents showed up about two weeks ago and questioned occupants about the previous residents. Posey, who said he recently had a "poltergeist-like" visit from a figure he believed to be Vukelich asking that she be found, said police went to the home Monday night with a search warrant.

"They told us we had to leave so they could search the house," he said.

Considine, other friends of Vukelich and a former police official in Glenwood said their suspicions will be vindicated if Vukelich's remains are found or if evidence is uncovered leading to what happened to her.

"It [the excavation] had me crying all the way to work," said Karen Buttron, a friend of Vukelich's who used to baby-sit her two daughters.

Vukelich "was turning her life around; everything was going for her," Buttron said. Friends said Vukelich had talked about leaving her husband, who sold the house after she disappeared.

Eric Graf, a former Glenwood police officer who took the original missing person report, never believed Vukelich voluntarily left her family.

"The idea that a mother is going to abandon her kids and disappear in the middle of the night with no car, with no nothing, it's mind-boggling," he said.

The case was not aggressively pursued in the beginning, Graf said, because of a lack of experienced detectives. He remained troubled by the case and in 1996, he asked Illinois State Police to get involved in the investigation.

Graf said he left the Glenwood department in 1997 in part because of the stress over the Vukelich case and other unsolved investigations. He works as an investigator for the Canadian National Railroad and is a part-time police officer in South Chicago Heights.

After Vukelich disappeared, Considine said he obtained custody of his daughter and raised her. The young woman is a Navy enlistee, and is married and has a child.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/ex-c ... 38c72.html


Ex-cop remembers case

Former officer says case was botched from the beginning


LAURI HARVEY
Times Staff Writer Jul 9, 2003



GLENWOOD -- Former Glenwood police Officer Eric Graf said the 12-year-old missing person's case gaining attention in the small village once again could have been solved years ago.

"Everything that's going on there now we tried to do back then and the village wouldn't let us do it because the village was worried about the (legal) exposure," Graf said. "This didn't have to go on for 12 years for the family, the village, me and my family."

Graf, 43, now lives in Northwest Indiana and works as an investigator for the Canadian National Railroad Police and for the village of South Chicago Heights.

On Feb. 23, 1991, Graf was the officer who took the missing person's report from David Vukelich. In the report, Vukelich told Graf his wife, 32-year-old Vikki Vukelich, slept on the couch in the living room of their home at 508 Tulip Drive after the two argued. He said that when he went to find her in the living room the next morning, she was gone.

Graf spent time in his off-duty hours handing out missing person's fliers to aid in the investigation and even searched nearby woods for the woman.

"I was so convinced that lady was murdered," Graf said.

He was troubled by information provided to investigators early on in the investigation that he felt was not properly followed up by former Detective Sgt. Brian Meyers.

"When we took the initial report and turned it over to investigator Meyers, he didn't have any sense of urgency to find her," Graf said. "We finally went over to the house, and the investigation led by him was so limited."

Graf said Vikki Vukelich's then-13-year-old daughter, Jill, provided information to investigators early on indicating her mother and step-father had a fight the night before the disappearance and that after that her step-father didn't allow her to go into the basement for several weeks.

Vikki Vukelich's family members and friends were active in the investigation, Graf said, and believe despite the couple's domestic disputes, Vukelich never would run away and leave her two daughters behind.

One neighbor described a fight the night before Vukelich's disappearance, saying the next day that David Vukelich refinished the driveway, placed asphalt in the crawl space, threw out some bricks in an outside trash can and tore up some carpeting in the home.

"All that evidence was left in limbo until I said, 'I can't take this anymore and stood up and said something,'" Graf said. "Until (Monday), all I could do was sit back and say it will eventually all come out."

After serving 13 years on the department, Graf decided he couldn't keep quiet about his concerns over what he felt amounted to the mishandling of the Vukelich case and four other violent crime investigations.

"This one may actually be solvable, but the others were so grossly mishandled, I don't know if they ever will," Graf said.

Meyers no longer works for the department and could not be located.

After going public with his concerns, Graf was first placed on administrative leave by then-Police Chief Russell Schoeneck in 1995 and then suspended without pay after going public with his concerns surrounding his department's handling of the investigation of the deaths of Janice Urban, 33, and her 5-year-old daughter.

The case was declared a murder/suicide, but Graf and others believed it to be a double murder.

"The Urban case was the fourth investigation where you could look back and say, 'My God, are we just going to sit back and do nothing?' " Graf said. "I knew I was right."

He also was charged with causing emotional distress to his own wife, Christine, by allegedly threatening to shoot himself and accused of not meeting psychological requirements for serving as a police officer.

The Glenwood Fire and Police Commission tossed out the charges of emotional distress to Graf's wife and agreed to a settlement of the remaining charges, which included Graf not admitting any wrongdoing, accepting a seven-day suspension and passing a psychological exam.

At the time, now-Mayor Jeanne Maggio was a village trustee and had oversight of the Police Department, Graf said. Graf accused Maggio of putting the breaks on investigations and hindering efforts that he believes could have led to some closure for the families involved in the cases, including the Vukelich case.

"This mayor mixed politics with policing, and I said, 'We're just not doing the job that we're empowered and entrusted to do," Graf said. "That mayor is still responsible for what happened with this."

Maggio was not available for comment Tuesday.

Eventually, the Vukelich case was handed over to the Illinois State Police. Graf praised that agency for never letting the case get cold, but he still feels it could have been handled much more quickly if early leads were investigated thoroughly.

"It just should have never taken this long," he said.

Lauri Harvey can be reached at lharvey@nwitimes.com or (219) 933-4169.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
Vikki Vukelich
508 E. Tulip Dr.
Glenwood, Illinois



http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/ex-c ... 38c72.html

On Feb. 23, 1991, Graf was the officer who took the missing person's report from David Vukelich. In the report, Vukelich told Graf his wife, 32-year-old Vikki Vukelich, slept on the couch in the living room of their home at 508 Tulip Drive after the two argued. He said that when he went to find her in the living room the next morning, she was gone.


One neighbor described a fight the night before Vukelich's disappearance, saying the next day that David Vukelich refinished the driveway, placed asphalt in the crawl space, threw out some bricks in an outside trash can and tore up some carpeting in the home.


Graf said Vikki Vukelich's then-13-year-old daughter, Jill, provided information to investigators early on indicating her mother and step-father had a fight the night before the disappearance and that after that her step-father didn't allow her to go into the basement for several weeks.

http://doenetwork.org/cases/1150dfil.html

A witness saw figures in a car at the Vukelich house on the night of her disappearance and heard a woman's voice screaming, 'Help me, please help me.' The car took off, and Vukelich was reported missing the next day.



 

Akoya

Well-known member
http://www.nwitimes.com/news/local/glen ... 17351.html


Glenwood evidence sent to lab

Investigators wrap up home search in missing woman case



LAURI HARVEY
Times Staff Writer Jul 12, 2003


GLENWOOD -- Investigators are wrapping up their search of the former Glenwood home of a woman missing since 1991.

Glenwood Police Chief Kevin Welsh said Friday the evidence seized by the FBI from the property at 508 Tulip Drive has been taken to their testing facilities in an effort to find more clues into the 1991 disappearance of Vikki Vukelich.

"Many things were removed from the home and sealed off as probable evidence," Welsh said, adding that he is uncertain when any test results on those items may be returned.

Welsh acknowledged that the FBI believes they have some evidence they may be able to move forward with, but did not elaborate on the nature of the evidence or the type of testing that may be involved.

"I think that in any case where you've got a missing person and are able to plug (evidence) into the puzzle, you can call that a fruitful investigation," he said.

Vukelich, a 32-year-old wife and the mother of two girls, was reported missing by her husband, David Vukelich, on Feb. 23, 1991.

When Vukelich disappeared from her then-home, David Vukelich, now of Dyer, told police five days after he'd last seen her that the South Holland beauty shop owner left voluntarily and stole $8,000 he had in a briefcase. He also maintained that there were reports of her being spotted in various locations within months of her disappearance.

David Vukelich told police at the time that he and his wife argued about going to a party the night she disappeared. He told police he went to bed and she slept on the couch. When he awoke the next morning, he told police, there was an empty glass of wine in the family room where he'd last seen his wife, who was gone.

Glenwood police reports showed the couple had several domestic disputes, with both being arrested and taken to the station on charges they abused the other.

David Vukelich, moved seven months after his wife's disappearance with their then-4-year-old daughter, Ashley, and has not had any contact with authorities involved in the investigation since work began at the home this week, according to Welsh.

Welsh said the FBI has been in touch with Vukelich's oldest daughter, Jill, but did not elaborate on the nature of those discussions. Friends of the woman, who is now 25-years-old, said she is stationed in the military in California and is returning to the Chicago area because of the renewed interest in her mother's missing person's case.

Since the work began this week, Welsh said a few people have contacted investigators wanting to share information on the case.

"We have had people calling that now want to speak up," Welsh said.

Still, no one is being acknowledged as a suspect and no one has been taken into custody in connection with the case, he said.

The latest probe has prompted renewed criticism of the initial investigation under the direction of former Det. Sgt. Brian Meyers.

Former Glenwood Police Officer Eric Graf blew the whistle in 1995 on what he believed amounted to tainted evidence handling and sloppy police work on four violent crimes and the Vukelich case.

The cases gained national media attention after Graf went public and he was subsequently disciplined. Graf eventually had his employment record cleared of the punishment. He left the Glenwood Police Department in 1997 and now lives in Northwest Indiana, working in law enforcement positions in the south suburbs.

On Wednesday, Welsh said he is not ruling out the possibility of looking at other cases previously investigated under the leadership of Meyers.

Welsh said Friday the success of this investigation will not have a bearing on whether the department decides to take another look at other controversial cases investigated under Meyers' direction.

"Every case stands on its own merits," he said. "They are not dependent on this investigation."

Meyers, reached at work Friday morning, declined comment on the issue.

"I wouldn't want to do anything that would compromise the investigation," Meyers said.

The Illinois State Police is the lead agency investigating Vukelich's disappearance, with the FBI and Glenwood Police Department also assisting in the probe this week. Investigators set up shop at the Tulip Drive home Monday, with the permission of the current homeowner who has been relocated to a hotel.

As of Friday, Welsh said the FBI was finished at the home and that Illinois State Police and Glenwood police were wrapping up the investigation and starting the restoration phase.

"We did cause a little bit of damage in the home," Welsh said. "...We hope soon to turn the home over to the homeowner."

Determining the next phase of the investigation is difficult, Welsh said, adding that the Illinois State Police remains the lead agency on the case.

Welsh thanked the members of the media for their cooperation during the week as well as, "all the local residents who really cooperated and helped us immensely."
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://www.nbcnews.com/feature/missing ... ed-n970781

No arrests 27 years after mother of two Vikki Vukelich vanished from Illinois

by Bianca Hillier

Mary Prskalo and Vikki Cihon met in 1980 in Calumet City, Illinois. Living in apartments just across the hall from each other, the two young women were just 19 and 20 years old, respectively. “We were both single mothers,” Mary told Dateline. “It was a common bond we had. We just clicked and remained friends.”

Both Vikki’s daughter Jill, and Mary’s daughter were babies at the time. Mary says they began raising their girls together. “That’s why we had the bond -- because she loved children. We shared that,” Mary said of her best friend, Vikki. “We would take the girls to the park, or swimming. I didn’t drive, so she took me to the grocery store.”

Mary says she and Vikki would also go out dancing together if they could get a babysitter to watch the kids. One night, though, when Mary was feeling sick, Vikki went to a nearby bowling lounge by herself while Mary stayed home with the kids. According to Mary, that’s where Vikki met a man named David Vukelich. Vikki and David began seeing each other, and Vikki Cihon soon became Vikki Vukelich. Shortly thereafter, Vikki and David had a daughter, Ashley. By then, Vikki, David, Jill and Ashley lived in Glenwood, Illinois about 30 minutes away from Mary, but Mary says she still saw Vikki often.

In February of 1991, Vikki, 32, spent her days running her hair salon, Hair Designs by Vikki. Her daughter Jill, then 12 years old, told Dateline her mother would always be home by 9:00 p.m. When Vikki got home from work on February 23, Jill says her mother was tired from the week. But Jill’s stepfather David wanted to go to a party with Vikki that night. “My mom didn’t want to go to the party,” Jill told Dateline. “She put my sister and I to bed, but I woke up twice that night because I heard them arguing.”

Jill told Dateline that the second time she woke up in the middle of the night, she found her stepfather David in the living room. Vikki wasn’t there, but Jill says she figured her mother was sleeping in the basement, which she sometimes did. Jill went back to sleep, expecting to see her mother in the morning. But when she woke up hours later, her mother was nowhere to be found.

“I woke up the next morning and asked David, ‘Where’s Mom?’” Vikki told Dateline. “He said she drank a whole bottle of wine and walked toward the highway.” He would later tell authorities that he went to bed at 10:00 p.m., after Vikki had left the house on foot and walked toward the highway, according to Illinois State Police Senior Agent Tony Gentry. David Vukelich did not reply to Dateline’s request for comment.

As the day went on and Vikki didn’t return home, Jill says she became upset that her mother hadn’t called. “She would always call me. Always. And she didn’t,” Jill said.
A few days later, though, Jill did receive a call. It was Mary, her mother’s best friend. Mary told Dateline she had heard from a mutual friend that Vikki hadn’t shown up to work. “I called [Vikki’s] house and asked Jill to go to the bathroom and check if her mom’s contacts and glasses were there,” Mary said. Vikki couldn’t see without her contacts or glasses, Mary added. When Jill asked why she wanted to know, Mary replied: “‘I’m just asking questions, that’s all Jill. I’m sure you’re going to hear from your mom.’”

Jill told Dateline she remembers reality sinking in during that phone call with Mary. “It made me think, ‘Oh, my God,’” Jill said. “She asked me to count all of Mom’s coats and her shoes and her contacts, and check her purse and her license. Everything was there.”

Mary said she then contacted the Glenwood Police Department to report Vikki missing. She says she wasn’t able to file the report, though, since she’s not family. The police called David and had him go to the station to file the report. Days after her mother was reported missing, Jill went to live with her biological father. Her stepsister Ashley, just four at the time, stayed with David. Meanwhile, Mary says she worked tirelessly to find Vikki.

“I called all the news channels, I called all the newspapers,” Mary told Dateline. “It was everywhere. I got flyers made that she was missing and put them everywhere.”
Shortly after Vikki’s disappearance, David and his daughter Ashley sold the family house and moved elsewhere in Illinois, according to Mary. Years went by with no leads or arrest in Vikki’s disappearance. Then, about three years after the mother of two was last seen, the Illinois State Police Department acquired all of Glenwood Police Department’s homicide cases. Senior Agent Gentry was assigned to Vikki’s case.

“Whenever I come into a case, I don’t look at any of the previously-done case reports. I start off fresh,” Senior Agent Gentry told Dateline. “So I went to the neighborhood and did a canvass.” But when Senior Agent Gentry went to Vikki’s neighbors, he learned the Glenwood Police Department hadn’t done the same years earlier in its investigation. The neighbors said they had never been asked about what happened the night Vikki vanished. “Everyone said they remembered that night,” Senior Agent Gentry said. “They said they heard horrible screams, and then it went quiet.”

Senior Agent Gentry said the Glenwood Police Department did interview David shortly after his wife’s disappearance, but seemed to have only collected his timeline of events from the night Vikki was last seen. The Illinois State Police tried to interview David again, but Senior Agent Gentry said David refused to meet. “I have never interviewed him at all. He refuses to meet with me – you can’t force him to come in,” he said. “I called David every year on the anniversary of her disappearance and on her birthday. Every year. I asked him if he would meet. He said no. I said I’d come to his front door. And he would never answer the door.”

Senior Agent Gentry told Dateline that David Vukelich is considered a suspect in Vikki’s disappearance, but “in the state of Illinois, if you don’t have a body, you don’t have a crime.” In the decades since Vikki’s disappearance, her daughter Jill has moved to Florida and had a child of her own. She says she didn’t want to raise her son in the town that holds so many grief-filled memories.

“Old memories are not good and not healthy. I’ll tell [my son] memories, and do the best that I can so that she is proud of me raising her grandson,” Jill said. “I strive to be like her: very strong, very independent. Kind, loving, loyal and fun. She was my best friend.” Jill says her mother’s best friend Mary has now become a mother figure to her.

“Mary has been my mama ever since. We’ve been through hell and back, and we’re still here,” Jill told Dateline, adding that she thinks of her mother every day. “I just want this to be over. Enough is enough. Someone needs to say something and just do right.” Mary, too, has never stopped fighting for Vikki.

“I’ll just miss her always, because I’m not getting her back,” Mary told Dateline. “There needs to be some closure and justice for Vikki.” Senior Agent Gentry is retired now, but says he still makes calls on Vikki’s case. “There is an investigator assigned to the case, but I’m sort of like a bull dog,” he said. “I get ahold of something, and I don’t let go.”

Vikki Vukelich would be 60 years old today. At the time of her disappearance, Vikki was 5’4” tall and weighed about 110 lbs., with blonde hair and blue eyes. If you have any information on the circumstances surrounding Vikki’s disappearance, please call the Illinois State Police at (217) 785-2035.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
Six years of Dateline's Missing in America: 134 still missing

Dateline NBC's social and digital series 'Missing in America' began on December 5, 2013, following a question the night before to our Facebook community, "Do you know anyone who has simply vanished?" The response was overwhelming. Since that first post, every week we have featured the story of a different missing person brought to our attention by a member of our social communities.

On this sixth anniversary of the series, approximately 40% of those we have featured are still missing.

Vikki Vukelich

In February of 1991, Vikki, 32, spent her days running her hair salon, Hair Designs by Vikki. Vikki’s daughter, Jill, told Dateline that when Vikki got home from work on February 23, 1991, Vikki was ready to go to bed, but her husband wanted to go to a party. When Jill woke up, her mother was nowhere to be found. Vikki’s husband, David, told authorities Vikki left the house on foot and walked toward the highway, according to Illinois State Police Senior Agent Tony Gentry. Senior Agent Gentry said the Glenwood Police Department did interview David shortly after his wife’s disappearance, but seemed to have only collected his timeline of events from the night Vikki was last seen. The Illinois State Police tried to interview David again, but Senior Agent Gentry said David refused to meet. Senior Agent Gentry told Dateline that David Vukelich is considered a suspect in Vikki’s disappearance, but “in the state of Illinois, if you don’t have a body, you don’t have a crime.” Senior Agent Gentry is retired now, but told Dateline in early 2019 that he still makes calls on Vikki’s case. At the time of her disappearance, Vikki was described as 5’4” tall and weighed about 110 lbs., with blonde hair and blue eyes. If you have any information on the circumstances surrounding Vikki’s disappearance, please call the Illinois State Police at (217) 785-2035.

https://www.nbcnews.com/dateline/six-ye ... g-n1096226
 

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