WI FOND DU LAC JANE DOE: WF, 15-21, found in wooded area in Fond Du Lac County, WI - 23 Nov 2008

Romulus

Well-known member
764UFWI - Unidentified Female

1609797821790.png 1609797867339.png
Reconstructions of the victim; victim's clothing; St. Benedict medal.

Date of Discovery: November 23, 2008
Location of Discovery: Campbellsport, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin
Estimated Date of Death: Summer or Fall 2008
State of Remains: Decomposed
Cause of Death: Suspected homicide

Physical Description
Estimated Age: 15-21 years old
Race: White, Hispanic, Native American, Asian or multiracial.
Sex: Female
Height: 4'10" to 5'4"
Weight: 110 to 135 lbs.
Hair Color: Light brown to dark blonde hair, 12-14 inches long with highlights.
Eye Color: Unknown
Distinguishing Marks/Features: Victim was likely pigeon-toed or knock-kneed. Healed fracture to one of the left ribs. She also had spina bifida occulta, which may have been asymptomatic.

Identifiers
Dentals: Available. She had an overbite and both fillings and dental sealents in her back teeth.
Fingerprints: Not available.
DNA: Available.

Clothing & Personal Items
Clothing: Black strapless top with pink trim and a pink bow that tied in the back; blue jeans that were rolled up slightly. The clothing was most likely purchased at a Family Dollar Store or general retailer, shipping between July 1 and July 15, 2008.
Jewelry: Wrist bracelet having pendants; wearing dark band similar to hair tie on right wrist. A penny-sized St. Benedict medal was also found in the water, but it is unknown if it belonged to the victim.
Additional Personal Items: Unknown.

Circumstances of Discovery
The victim was found submerged in a pond in a secluded, wooded area in rural Fond Du Lac County, Wisconsin on November 23, 2008. The location is approximately half way between Fond Du Lac and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Investigators suspect foul play was involved in the victim's death due to the location of her remains and the fact that she wore no shoes or socks when she was found.

She was laid to rest in Cattaraugus Cemetery in Waupun, Wisconsin in 2011

The victim's body was exhumed on April 26, 2018. Advanced testing on isotopes in her bones and teeth are hoped to give clues to where she may have originally come from, had she not been native to Wisconsin. DNA phenotyping is also hoped to be performed on the remains for an estimation of her ethnic background, skin tone, eye color and face shape.

Isotope testing performed on her remains indicated she was most likely native to the Southwestern United States, such as Arizona and New Mexico. She resided in the midwest, such as Southwestern Wisconsin, Northern Iowa or Southern Minnesota for about a year or less before she died.

Investigating Agency(s)
Agency Name: Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner's Office
Agency Contact Person: N/A
Agency Phone Number: 920-929-3366
Agency E-Mail: N/A
Agency Case Number: 08-15891

Agency Name: Fond Du Lac County Sheriff’s Office
Agency Contact Person: Detective Panagiotis Vergos
Agency Phone Number: 920-929-3390
Agency E-Mail: N/A
Agency Case Number: Unknown

NCIC Case Number: U440018199
NCMEC Case Number: 1115220
NamUs Case Number: 3043

Information Source(s)
NamUs
NCMEC
Wisconsin Department of Justice
Wikipedia
WBay
FDL Reporter (4/23/18)
FDL Reporter (8/21/18)

*Click the Report button if you'd like this case moved to the general discussion area to be opened for commenting.
 
Last edited:

Akoya

Well-known member
FOND DU LAC COUNTY JANE DOE - found in a pond near Campbellsport

FOND DU LAC COUNTY JANE DOE: MF, 15-21, found in a pond near Campbellsport - 23 November 2008 Zw2bKMI





The victim was found submerged in a pond in a secluded, wooded area in rural Fond Du Lac County, Wisconsin on November 23, 2008. The location is approximately half way between Fond Du Lac and Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Investigators suspect foul play was involved in the victim's death due to the location of her remains and the fact that she wore no shoes or socks when she was found.

She was laid to rest in Cattaraugus Cemetery in Waupun, Wisconsin in 2011

The victim's body was exhumed on April 26, 2018. Advanced testing on isotopes in her bones and teeth are hoped to give clues to where she may have originally come from, had she not been native to Wisconsin. DNA phenotyping is also hoped to be performed on the remains for an estimation of her ethnic background, skin tone, eye color and face shape.

Isotope testing performed on her remains indicated she was most likely native to the Southwestern United States, such as Arizona and New Mexico. She resided in the midwest, such as Southwestern Wisconsin, Northern Iowa or Southern Minnesota for about a year or less before she died.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://www.namus.gov/UnidentifiedPersons/Case#/3043?nav

FOND DU LAC COUNTY JANE DOE: MF, 15-21, found in a pond near Campbellsport - 23 November 2008 CRjzE45


Unidentified Person / NamUs #UP3043 Female, Multiple
Date Body Found
November 23, 2008
Location Found
Campbellsport, Wisconsin
Estimated Age Range
15-21 Years

Case Numbers
NCMEC Number
1115220
ME/C Case Number
08-15891

Demographics
Sex
Female
Race / Ethnicity
White / Caucasian, Hispanic / Latino

Estimated Age Group
Adult - Pre 30
Estimated Age Range (Years)
15-21
Estimated Year of Death
2008
Estimated PMI
--
Height
5' 1"-5' 2"(61-62 inches) , Estimated
Weight
115-120 lbs, Estimated

Circumstances
Type
Unidentified Deceased
Date Body Found
November 23, 2008
NamUs Case Created
January 21, 2009
ME/C QA Reviewed
June 6, 2011

Location Found
General Location
W4617 Skylie Drive
Campbellsport, Wisconsin 53010
County
Fond du Lac County
GPS Coordinates
--
Circumstances of Recovery
Partially decomposed body found.
Details of Recovery
Inventory of Remains
All parts recovered
Condition of Remains
Not recognizable - Decomposing/putrefaction

Physical Description
Hair Color
Brown
Head Hair Description
Light brown to dark blonde 12 to 14 inches long with some color variation light and dark.
Body Hair Description
--
Facial Hair Description
--
Left Eye Color
Unknown
Right Eye Color
Unknown
Eye Description
Unknown
Distinctive Physical Features
No Information Entered

Clothing and Accessories
Item
Description
Clothing Blue jeans/black top with pink trim On the Body
Jewelry Wearing dark band similar to hair tie on right wrist

Investigating Agencies
CASE OWNER
Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner's Office
(920) 929-3366

Agency Case Number
--
No Investigator Entered
Fond du Lac County Sheriff's Office
(920) 929-3390

Agency Case Number
--
Panagiotis Vergos, Detective
--
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fond_du_Lac_County_Jane_Doe

Fond du Lac County Jane Doe
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fond du Lac County Jane Doe is an unidentified female discovered on November 23, 2008, near Campbellsport, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin. She has yet to be identified, although many efforts have been made to discover who she was. Investigators believe that it is possible that she may not have been from the area.[2][3] Her face was reconstructed digitally by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in 2009 and again in 2018 to give an approximation of how she may have appeared in life. The victim was between fifteen and twenty-one years old when she died, placing her year of birth between 1987 and 1994.[1]

Discovery
The remains of a young woman were found frozen in a creek by hunters on November 23, 2008, in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, near an abandoned farm.[4] To extract the body, investigators were forced to chisel away the ice and scuba divers searched the bottom for evidence.[3] Some articles of clothing were found, including a strapless Zoey Beth black and pink top with a pink bow, originating from Family Dollar, distributed in the spring of 2008.[2][5][6] The underclothing that she wore, also from Family Dollar, was shipped only between July 1 and July 15, 2008.[4][7] Her jeans were that of the Angels brand and the bottom of the legs had been rolled up, somewhat, and an elastic ponytail holder was found on her wrist.[4][8]

No socks or shoes were found at the scene. Initially, no jewelry was found, until a penny-sized St. Benedict medal was found by divers, but it may not have belonged to her, as examiners could not be certain how long it had been in the water. However, some reports claim that a bracelet containing several pendants was also found on the girl's remains.[9] The hair was a shoulder-length light brown, possibly having hair highlights due to having some different shades.[4][5] The clothing had caused some issues with investigators, as many of the different articles were in various sizes.[7] It has been determined, however, that she was most likely around 120 pounds.[6]

FOND DU LAC COUNTY JANE DOE: MF, 15-21, found in a pond near Campbellsport - 23 November 2008 Zw2bKMI

Determining the cause of death was inconclusive, as the severe decomposition on the body had removed all signs of possible violence from the remains. However, the case is believed to have been a murder, as suicide was eliminated as a possibility of the girl's death. The circumstances of the location of the remains had also sparked suspicion among authorities.[10] Toxicology tests were conducted to see if any drugs or alcohol had been in her system, yet the results were never released.[2][7][11][12]

Although the body was found in autumn, she had died in the summer, two to four months previously. This was established by examining traces from insects that were found on the remains.[4] She had an overbite, and some fillings and dental sealants were found on the upper molars with no current cavities. The overbite was not described as extreme, but may have been noticeable, which could be a reliable feature depicted in her facial reconstruction. The estimated height was between 4'10" and 5'4", the victim being between fifteen and twenty-one years old and weighing between 110 to 135 pounds, at an "average frame".[4] Examiners believe she was either white or Hispanic, although Native American and Asian races cannot be ruled out.[7][13] She also may have been biracial. Other physical characteristics included a healed rib fracture and being pigeon toed or knock-kneed, which may have been noticeable when she walked, as her feet were slanted inward.[4][12] She also suffered from spina bifida occulta, but may have been unaware of the condition.[1]

To obtain DNA information, her femur was transported to the University of Texas.[3] The victim's dental records were also recorded to compare to missing persons.[6]

Investigation
At least 200 leads have been explored into discovering the identity of the victim.[10] A computer-generated reconstruction was created from the skull by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children from mortuary photographs and a CT scan of the skull that were submitted to the center.[2][4][7] The reconstruction of the victim generated over two hundred tips that did not produce solid leads, as the composite apparently resembled a large number of missing people.[3][14] Former missing person Amanda Berry, one of several possible identities of the Jane Doe, was ruled out by DNA analysis. She was recovered alive in 2013.[15]

Besides Amanda Berry, two other individuals that were eventually located were also ruled out of the case: Connie McCallister and Brittany Peart.[13] McCallister, native to Wisconsin, was abducted at age 16 and taken to Mexico. She was eventually recovered alive after meeting a "church missionary" that reported the find to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.[16] Brittany Peart disappeared in July 2008 from Elkton, Maryland. Peart's remains were located and identified in December 2011. Her cause of death remains unreleased.[17]

The Jane Doe's body was buried in 2011 after the investigation turned cold.[2][8] Television shows such as America's Most Wanted were contacted to broadcast the case to possibly reveal new clues.[6][18] A Facebook page was also created to generate leads for the case.[12][19][20]

On April 23, 2018, a revised reconstruction was released and plans to exhume the victim for isotope testing and DNA phenotyping to predict geographical locations where she may have originated and to develop a clearer estimation of her ethnicity and physical characteristics.[21]

In August 2018, it was revealed isotopic analysis was performed on the victim's remains in the IsoForensics laboratory located in Utah. The testing indicated the Jane Doe likely spent most of her life in the Southwestern United States, such as Arizona and New Mexico. She had lived in the Midwest, perhaps states such as southwestern Wisconsin, northern Iowa and southern Minnesota for less than a year preceding her death. [6] It was speculated by investigators that her case was related to the so-called West Mesa murders, but this was later ruled out.[22]
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fond_du_Lac_County_Jane_Doe

Fond du Lac Jane Doe

FOND DU LAC COUNTY JANE DOE: MF, 15-21, found in a pond near Campbellsport - 23 November 2008 ZpKb3tH


Digital images created from CT scans of skull to depict an estimation of the victim in life
Two reconstructions of the victim created by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children
Born Approx. 1987–1994
Status Unidentified for 10 years, 8 months and 27 days
Died Summer of 2008 (aged 15–21)[1]
Cause of death Undetermined, manner of death presumed to be homicide.
Body discovered November 23, 2008
Cambellsport, Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, United States
Resting place Cattaraugus Cemetery, Waupun, Wisconsin, United States
Known for Unidentified victim of homicide
Height Between 4 ft 10 in (1.47 m)
and 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m)
Weight 110 lb (50 kg) (minimum)
135 lb (61 kg) (maximum)
Website Facebook
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://fox6now.com/2012/02/29/unraveling-the-jane-doe-mystery/

Unraveling the Jane Doe mystery
POSTED 10:07 PM, FEBRUARY 29, 2012, BY BRAD HICKS

FOND DU LAC COUNTY — The death of “Jane Doe” is a cold case with few clues, and no leads. A young woman is identified by numbers in a national database by her DNA and her dental records, but her past is unknown, and her death remains a mystery. “Jane Doe’s” death is being investigated as a homicide, but before the case can be solved, one question has to be answered: who is she?

Deer hunters discovered Jane Doe’s body frozen in a creek on November 23, 2008. The hunters reported seeing two legs and a midsection, and that was it. Detectives arrived and chopped the ice several inches away from her body – basically making a sort of chalk outline. An autopsy was done, and it was determined Jane Doe was in an advanced stage of decomposition and basically encased in ice. That’s when the mystery began.

More than three years later, after loads of leads and dozens of dead ends, investigators admit they’re stuck. What they know is overshadowed by what they don’t know, and the facts of the case fuel more questions than they answer.

Jane Doe’s body was found in a small creek on an abandoned farm in southern Fond du Lac County. From the Mayville/Kewaskum exit off of Highway 41, it’s one of the first remote areas you’d encounter. It’s also a mile and a half up the road from an adult video store, but Jane Doe doesn’t appear in the store surveillance tapes.

An aerial photo obtained by FOX6 News from the federal government shows what the farm looked like just weeks before Jane Doe’s body was discovered. The creek where she was found crosses under the tree-lined driveway, 500 feet from the road. Investigators believe she was dumped there for a reason, but it is unclear whether the person who did it knew the farm was abandoned, or whether it was just the first convenient spot. What investigators do know is that Jane Doe didn’t get there by herself, and this is not a suicide.

Forensic entomologist Neal Haskell analyzed insects found within Jane Doe’s body. By correlating different species with weather data, Haskell determined her body had been decomposing for two to four months before it was found. “Normally, we don’t get bodies with insects frozen in water,” Haskell said.

That means Jane Doe had been dumped in July, August or September of 2008. That time frame was reinforced by something found at the scene.

After Jane Doe had been extracted from the ice, her body was brought to the Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner’s Office. Water and time had taken away many details. “She was quite decomposed when she came in. There’s a chemical change with the soft tissues called adopecere, which we had to deal with. It replaces the soft tissue,” the Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner said.

This means any wounds, scars, tattoos or piercings she may have had were gone. Whether she had any is unknown. However, her remains revealed other clues. She was probably white or Hispanic, but Native American or Asian American cannot be ruled out. She could have been biracial. All investigators know is she was not African American.

Based on Jane Doe’s bones, it is believed she was between 15 and 20 years old – a young woman born between 1987 and 1993. Her bones also show she was a bit pigeon-toed or knock-kneed – enough that it may have been noticeable when she walked.

Investigators believe she was between 4’10” and 5’4″ tall, and in a range from 110 to 135 pounds. In other words, she was not tall, she was not skinny and she was not fat. “I would say, in general, she was pretty average frame, and pretty average size,” the Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner said.

Investigators say Jane Doe’s hair was pretty well preserved. “There was some alternation in the shade of brown, so she may have had highlights,” the Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner said.

Her skull and autopsy photos were sent to the National Center For Missing and Exploited Children in Virginia. Using a CT Scan of her skull, and tissue-depth markers for her estimated age and ancestry, they were able to rebuild an estimate of what the time and water had taken away – giving Jane Doe a face.

However, when this same process was done with other images of people sketched from their skulls – matched with a picture of the person it turned out to be, there are dramatic differences. In one case, the actual picture of a boy shows that he is not Hispanic, as the sketch implies. Certain features may be more accurate through this process than the image as a whole, and in Jane Doe’s case, one feature stands out.

Joe Mullins noticed, when studying Jane Doe’s skull, that she had an overbite – not an extreme one, but enough that it may have been noticeable. “It could be something that helps people spark that recognition,” Mullins said. Jane Doe also had sealants on four upper molars, four fillings on her lower molars, and her x-rays reveal she had no current cavities.

Investigators say this reveals she was cared for, and another clue that indicates this – her clothing was fairly new: a black tube top with pink across the top, and a pink band below the breast with a pink bow in the back. It was sold at Family Dollar stores starting in the Spring of 2008.

FOX6 News spoke with the exclusive importer of the bra and panty set she was wearing, and only one shipment was sent to Family Dollar on July 1st, 2008. Within two weeks, it was for sale in the stores.

This indicates that at some point between mid-July and when she died, she either bought, stole or was given a bra and panty set from Family Dollar.

The jeans she was wearing were Angels brand, that could have been purchased at Kohl’s. Her pants were rolled up and she was found with no socks or shoes. Perhaps, since it was warm out when she died, she’d been wearing sandals.

The size of Jane Doe’s clothing is a conundrum. The bra is a 36C, but the top was a small. The panties were a large, but the jeans were size three. Investigators have struggled to make sense of the disparity.

Equally puzzling, Jane Doe wore no jewelry, just an elastic ponytail band around her wrist. FOX6 wondered whether, with decomposition, her jewelry had fallen off, if she was wearing any at all. FOX6 brought expert metal detector, Paul Humphries to the scene, and the search uncovered one item of interest – a St. Benedict medal about the size of a penny. Corrosion experts were unable to tell how long it had been in the water. It could have belonged to Jane Doe, but could have been someone elses.

Jane Doe’s dental chart and DNA have been entered into every relevant database, and her sketch has been made available to media across the country. Dozens of leads have come in, and investigators track these leads on a spreadsheet. The FBI’s Violent Criminal Apprehension Program developed a lead – a potential offender with ties to Wisconsin, and a young woman who had disappeared in July of 2008, but when they ran the DNA it was negative.

So who is Jane Doe? What events led up to her death? When will the clue come? Investigators say, they remain frustrated with this case. If you have any information that may help investigators, or if you believe you may know who this woman is, you’re asked to call 920-929-3388.

Investigators don’t know how Jane Doe died – whether it was a drug overdose, a murder, or something else. They were able to perform toxicology tests using muscle tissue, and aren’t releasing the results of those tests, but insist they still do not know the cause of death in this case.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://fox6now.com/2018/08/21/new-clues-in-jane-doe-case-in-fond-du-lac-county-from-november-2008/

Officials release new clues in Fond du Lac County Jane Doe case from November 2008

POSTED 3:11 PM, AUGUST 21, 2018, BY FOX6 NEWS, UPDATED AT 03:12PM, AUGUST 21, 2018

FOND DU LAC — The Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office announced on Tuesday, Aug. 21 it has new information related to a decade-old Jane Doe case.

The victim’s remains were discovered by deer hunters in a shallow creek in the southern part of Fond du Lac County on November 23, 2008.

As part of the ongoing investigation to determine the identity of Jane Doe, the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office submitted samples to a laboratory for chemical isotope analysis. In turn, historical data was delivered to investigators that provided a geographical region where Jane Doe may have previously resided.

The results from those tests showed that Jane Doe was a resident of the regions spanning from Las Cruces and Albuquerque, New Mexico to Flagstaff, Arizona for the majority of her life. The test results also indicated that she likely resided in the regions of South West Wisconsin, Southern Minnesota, and Northern Iowa for less than a year prior to her death.



Officials say Jane Doe was petite, approximately 15-21 years of age, stood approximately 5’1” tall, and weighed around 120 pounds. Her hair was light brown to dark blonde in color, 12-14 inches in length, and she is believed to be Caucasian; however, she may be of Hispanic, Asian, or Native American decent. Jane Doe’s DNA is entered into the National DNA Database and her dental records are also on file. These records are routinely checked against missing persons as well as other databases.

The Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office is working closely with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC), and with other jurisdictions to disseminate Jane Doe’s information in hopes of identifying her. Anyone with information is encouraged to contact the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office or NCMEC tip lines below.

Fond du Lac County Sheriff Tip Line: 920-906-4777
NCMEC Tip Line: 1-800-THE LOST
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://www.fdlreporter.com/story/n...dl-county-jane-doe-case-continues/3541370002/

One year after the exhumation of FDL County's Jane Doe, the search for answers continues

Fond du Lac County's Jane Doe was exhumed on April 26, 2018.

She was found in November 2008.


FOND DU LAC – A year ago on April 26, a backhoe — and later shovels — heaved up dirt from a Cattaragus Cemetery grave.

The earth formed a mountain in front of a gray stone bearing an image of a woman and a QR code, which passersby with cell phones can use to learn more about her.

There are no dates of birth or death — just a date found, Nov. 23, 2008, and the name “Jane Doe.”

Around the grave stood members of the Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office and forensics anthropologists, watching a coffin covered with plastic lifted from the ground. Their task: to care for the woman within, and use new technology to find out what happened to her 10 years before.

The story of Jane Doe

Hunting season had just began when three men in search of deer came across the body of a young woman partially submerged in frozen creek behind the town of Ashford’s Skyline Drive. The secluded and wooded area was a “known dumping site,” retired Fond du Lac County Sheriff Mick Fink told USA TODAY NETWORK- Wisconsin.

The woman’s body was badly decomposed, and investigators had to work in the November chill to remove her body from the water and look for clues. She wore no socks or shoes, but an elastic hairband encircled her wrist. She was dressed in a pink bra, Angels blue jeans, and strapless black and pink top tied with a pink bow in the back. In the water, investigators found a medal of St. Benedict, but it was not known if it was related to her.

Her bones placed her at 5 feet 1 inch tall, and between 15 to 21 years old. Her light brown to dark blonde hair was 12 to 14 inches in length, and her weight about 120 pounds. Her race could not be definitively determined, but she is believed to be Caucasian, although Native American, Hispanic and Asian descent remain possibilities, according to the Sheriff’s Office in August 2018.

Her death, which is believed to be a homicide, took place between July and September based on the insects found in her body. According to Forensic Anthropologist Leslie Eisenberg, “Jane Doe” was knock-kneed, pigeon-toed or both.

The search for identity
In 2011, Jane Doe’s body, which had been held in the Fond du Lac County Medical Examiner’s Office, was buried in a light blue casket at Cattaragus Cemetery near Waupun, as law enforcement, area residents and a chaplain paid their respects.

As the years continued to pass, the sheriff’s office combed through hundreds of leads on the county's only unidentified person, while working to get a composite of Jane Doe created by the Center of Missing and Exploited Children in front of as many eyes as possible. Her story was featured on “America’s Most Wanted” and a Facebook page was created with her information.

Then, in November 2016, Fond du Lac County Sheriff’s Office Detectives Ryan Murphy and Pete Vergos were given the opportunity to present the case to a panel of national investigators and a forensic anthropologist through the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in the hopes of mining new tips on how to handle the case, and garner new leads. The panel recommended creating a new composite with technology that had improved since 2009, and exhuming the body for forensic testing, said the sheriff’s office.

In April 2018, a new composite was released, which featured six different profiles of Jane Doe, and her exhumed body was sent to the Utah-based IsoForensics for forensic testing.

While technology can make things more complex, said Fond du Lac County Sheriff Ryan Waldschmidt, it is also exciting and “can also help prove things or determine things even better than before.”

Less than four months after the exhumation, the results were announced. Chemical isotope analysis revealed that Jane Doe likely spent the majority of her life in the area between Flagstaff, Arizona, and Las Cruces and Albuquerque, New Mexico. However, in the last year of her life, isotopes show she likely lived in the region spanning from southwest Wisconsin, northern Iowa and Southern Minnesota, according to the sheriff’s office.

With the information, the sheriff’s office began reaching out to multiple law enforcement agencies in the specified regions to see if there were any leads that they had not checked into yet. A year after her exhumation, no “concrete” leads have come out of the contacts, said Waldschmidt.

The areas laid by the testing are not the only ones on which investigators are focusing. While the results give investigators a place they can start from, they do not tell where a person is exactly from or do they come with “one hundred percent certainty,” said Waldschmidt. The areas given have the highest concentration of the isotopes, but they could still be found throughout the country. To gain more information, further tests are also being run to analyze DNA in different ways, and learn more about Jane Doe.

As the two detectives assigned full time to the case, Vergos and Murphy carry on this wide-spread search. Their days are spent doing “good old-fashioned police work,” searching for leads, going through lab results and reports and reaching out to other agencies. Each aspect of this must be “meticulously” documented and added to the thousands-pages long case file, as it can never be known if a piece of information may later be important, Waldschmidt said.

Through this combination of technology and dedication, Waldschmidt believes that one day, the woman will no longer only be known as Fond du Lac County’s Jane Doe, but reclaim her identity. Once they do, the investigators will work to piece together what led up to her death and who is responsible for her disposal in the creek.

“We’re confident that all of this put together, the hard work and determination, will help to successfully identify her,” said Waldschmidt.
 

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