DYLAN REDWINE: Colorado vs. Mark Redwine for 2012 murder of 13-year-old son *GUILTY!*

Justice for Dylan Redwine: seven years and waiting

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Dylan Redwine disappeared seven years ago Tuesday in La Plata County, an event that prompted a yearslong investigation that led to the arrest of the boy’s father on suspicion of murder.

Dylan’s disappearance Nov. 19, 2012, and subsequent homicide investigation sparked national attention. The boy, 13, was last seen with his father, Mark Redwine, on surveillance footage at the Durango-La Plata County Airport and at Walmart in Durango.

“It’s kind of surreal,” said Elaine Hatfield-Hall, Dylan’s mother, in an interview Tuesday with The Durango Herald. “Sometimes, it doesn’t feel like it happened.”

Dylan’s last known whereabouts were at his father’s home, 2343 County Road 500, just north of Vallecito Reservoir. His last phone activity or communication was at 9:37 p.m. Nov. 18, 2012, when he sent text messages to a friend about plans to meet up.

Dylan’s friend sent a text at 6:46 the next morning asking, “where are you,” and received no response.

Investigators found the boy’s partial remains in June 2013 about 8 miles up Middle Mountain Road. Hikers found the boy’s skull in November 2015 about 1½ miles up Middle Mountain Road from where the rest of his remains were found.

Law enforcement arrested Mark Redwine, now 58, in July 2017 in Washington state and accused him of second-degree murder and child abuse. He has been incarcerated ever since at the La Plata County Jail.

Redwine’s trial date has been postponed at least three times in the past year. He is currently scheduled for a four-week trial in April 2020.

 
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Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
Mother of Dylan Redwine pushed new law now used in high-profile crimes

Though the pain of losing her son will never heal, Elaine Hall said a law she helped pass, making tampering with a deceased body a felony, offers at least a little respite.

“The healing process is obviously day-by-day, and I’m not sure I’ll ever fully heal,” Hall said. “But ... seeing it used, I’m happy with that. It puts some meat behind the other charges.”



In 2016, their efforts were successful, elevating tampering with a body from a misdemeanor to a Class 3 felony. The charge now carries a sentence of up to 12 years in prison, and is usually tacked onto more serious crimes, like murder.

A report in the Montrose Daily Press in January said there have been 34 charges and 12 convictions for tampering with a deceased body since it became a felony in 2016.

The charge was used in the case of Chris Watts, who pleaded guilty in 2018 to killing his pregnant wife and two young daughters.

In March, Letecia Stauch, who is accused of killing her 11-year-old stepson earlier this year, was also charged with tampering with a deceased body, according to KKTV 11 News.

Sixth Judicial District Attorney Christian Champagne said it is important to make the crime a felony instead of a misdemeanor.

“When we see someone who is doing inappropriate things with the remains of our loved ones, I think it strikes many people as a very serious crime,” he said.


For Hall, she said she’s happy to have helped future victims get more justice.

“We knew our children were victims, and there was no severe penalty in Colorado for tampering with remains,” she said. “We felt it needed to be more severe.”
Is this coming into play with Chad Daybell, since TWO children were found on HIS property?
 

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

Administrator
Staff member

Judge rules October trial for Mark Redwine remains a go​

The trial for Mark Redwine, the Vallecito man accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, remains on track to begin later this month.

In a recent motion, Redwine’s defense attorneys requested to delay the trial until “after the COVID-19 pandemic has been resolved,” arguing the pandemic presents “unreasonable” public health risks that would prevent a fair trial.

“Defense counsel argues that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it will prevent a jury panel that represents a fair cross-section of the community,” according to court records.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, certain people who qualify may be excused upon request from jury duty, including those who are immunocompromised, have certain illnesses or live in a nursing home.

Sixth Judicial District Judge Jeffery Wilson, however, ruled Friday the regulations in place do not violate any constitutional rights, determining Redwine will still stand trial Oct. 29.

“While the trial will certainly be longer and different than jury trials prior to the COVID-19 pandemic ... none of these minor inconveniences impinge on the defendant’s rights to due process or a fair trial,” Wilson wrote.
 

Ranch

Well-known member

Judge rules October trial for Mark Redwine remains a go​

The trial for Mark Redwine, the Vallecito man accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan, remains on track to begin later this month.

In a recent motion, Redwine’s defense attorneys requested to delay the trial until “after the COVID-19 pandemic has been resolved,” arguing the pandemic presents “unreasonable” public health risks that would prevent a fair trial.

“Defense counsel argues that due to the COVID-19 pandemic, it will prevent a jury panel that represents a fair cross-section of the community,” according to court records.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, certain people who qualify may be excused upon request from jury duty, including those who are immunocompromised, have certain illnesses or live in a nursing home.

Sixth Judicial District Judge Jeffery Wilson, however, ruled Friday the regulations in place do not violate any constitutional rights, determining Redwine will still stand trial Oct. 29.

“While the trial will certainly be longer and different than jury trials prior to the COVID-19 pandemic ... none of these minor inconveniences impinge on the defendant’s rights to due process or a fair trial,” Wilson wrote.
I'm glad that this trial is finally going to start. This whole case has been in slow motion from day one. From a delay in searching MR's home to the long wait to arrest and charge him after the state had plenty of evidence showing he is guilty.

I noticed that because of Covid-19 people living in nursing homes are excused from jury duty in this case. Did they really get people showing up from nursing homes before Covid to serve on juries?
 

Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
I'm glad that this trial is finally going to start. This whole case has been in slow motion from day one. From a delay in searching MR's home to the long wait to arrest and charge him after the state had plenty of evidence showing he is guilty.

I noticed that because of Covid-19 people living in nursing homes are excused from jury duty in this case. Did they really get people showing up from nursing homes before Covid to serve on juries?
You're reading my mind! A case of this magnitude? I wouldn't think so.
 

GrandmaBear

Deputized Emu Slayer/Horse Thief Hunter
Oh I absolutely hope there are going to be cameras in the courtroom! Didn't we read that Is going to happen?
I looked at a few articles and only found this one that says after voir dire the proceedings will be streamed live via WebEx to ensure safety in the courtroom re Covid, etc. I am sure. I assume that means for reporters to pick it up as well and it be streamed to the public?

 

Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
I looked at a few articles and only found this one that says after voir dire the proceedings will be streamed live via WebEx to ensure safety in the courtroom re Covid, etc. I am sure. I assume that means for reporters to pick it up as well and it be streamed to the public?

And that will only happen if they think they're going to get viewers. Hopefully Court TV will pick it up.
 

GrandmaBear

Deputized Emu Slayer/Horse Thief Hunter
And that will only happen if they think they're going to get viewers. Hopefully Court TV will pick it up.
I did spend some time at the Court TV website and did not find a single thing referencing this case or the trial. I am surprised a bit, this is supposed to be a 7 week trial and although it is a older case because of the time that has elapsed and is not well known and fresh everywhere, it is still a pretty well known case...

In following many Colorado cases though, they have laws regarding coverage and quite often the trials are not televised. Berreth/Frazee was not and that was a highly followed case. They did cover with a pool camera some of the hearings. Leticia Stauch so far we have some of the hearings covered but the trial may well be a different story.

I did see the defense tried to get a change of venue in the Redwine case and said publicity in the case was a factor (it was denied). It starts this week doesn't it in which case I would think we would find something about someone intending to cover it?
 

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

Administrator
Staff member

Dylan Redwine: Outrage sparks over jury as trial begins for dad accused of murdering son during custody visit​

The prosecution and defense in the case of a Colorado man on trial for murder apparently got into a squabble on Friday, after concerns were raised about probing into potential jurors’ backgrounds.

The Durango Herald reports that over 2,000 potential are being sifted through to find the best panel for the murder trial of Colorado man Mark Redwine, who’s accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan Redwine.

Redwine’s lawyer, John Moran, told the judge he had concerns over “extremely private information” obtained on over 1,000 potential jurors, including any history of attempted suicide, sex abuse, or child abuse.

“This rises to the level of outrageous governmental conduct,” Moran said. “It is illegal for them to have taken this information in the first place … it is criminal, your honor.”

Moran also argued that the defense didn’t know how long the prosecution had the documents before sharing them.

District Attorney Christian Champagne weighed in, calling Moran’s accusations outrageous.

“These allegations are so outrageous, and so over the top, I can’t hold my tongue your honor,” Champagne said.

Champagne explained that the background check information came from a record-keeping program at the Sheriff’s Office called “Record Management Services.”

“There’s nothing wrong with anything that’s happened by looking at these records and proactively giving it to the defense,” he said.

District Judge Jeffery Wilson ultimately stopped the discussion and called it a “big ado about next to nothing.” He ended the hearing by saying he didn’t see the matter as a big deal.

“I’m done, I have nothing to say to you. I don’t want to hear you talk,” Champagne told Moran after the court hearing.

“Follow the law!” Moran shot back.
 

Cousin Dupree

Taxidermist Working on Mel & GrandmaBear Piñatas

Dylan Redwine: Outrage sparks over jury as trial begins for dad accused of murdering son during custody visit​

The prosecution and defense in the case of a Colorado man on trial for murder apparently got into a squabble on Friday, after concerns were raised about probing into potential jurors’ backgrounds.

The Durango Herald reports that over 2,000 potential are being sifted through to find the best panel for the murder trial of Colorado man Mark Redwine, who’s accused of killing his 13-year-old son, Dylan Redwine.

Redwine’s lawyer, John Moran, told the judge he had concerns over “extremely private information” obtained on over 1,000 potential jurors, including any history of attempted suicide, sex abuse, or child abuse.

“This rises to the level of outrageous governmental conduct,” Moran said. “It is illegal for them to have taken this information in the first place … it is criminal, your honor.”

Moran also argued that the defense didn’t know how long the prosecution had the documents before sharing them.

District Attorney Christian Champagne weighed in, calling Moran’s accusations outrageous.

“These allegations are so outrageous, and so over the top, I can’t hold my tongue your honor,” Champagne said.

Champagne explained that the background check information came from a record-keeping program at the Sheriff’s Office called “Record Management Services.”

“There’s nothing wrong with anything that’s happened by looking at these records and proactively giving it to the defense,” he said.

District Judge Jeffery Wilson ultimately stopped the discussion and called it a “big ado about next to nothing.” He ended the hearing by saying he didn’t see the matter as a big deal.

“I’m done, I have nothing to say to you. I don’t want to hear you talk,” Champagne told Moran after the court hearing.

“Follow the law!” Moran shot back.

When I was a juror I was asked if I'd ever been a victim of a crime. None of those other things. However, the trial I sat in on wasn't murder related to sex abuse.
 

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