FL MARJORIE "CHRISTY" LUNA: Missing from Greenacres City, Florida - 27 May 1984 - Age 8

Jason Futch

Well-known member
Marjorie Christina Luna



Marjorie, circa 1984; Age-progression at age 41 (circa 2017); Delbert Mosher; Victor Wonyetye; Charles Rambo, circa 1984; Willis Rambo, circa 1984
  • Missing Since05/27/1984
  • Missing FromGreenacres City, Florida
  • ClassificationNon-Family Abduction
  • SexFemale
  • RaceWhite
  • Date of Birth04/07/1976 (44)
  • Age8 years old
  • Height and Weight4'0, 60 pounds
  • Clothing/Jewelry DescriptionA turquoise bodysuit and no socks or shoes.
  • Medical ConditionsMarjorie is hearing-impaired.
  • Distinguishing CharacteristicsCaucasian female. Brown hair, hazel eyes. Marjorie has a strawberry birthmark on the right side of her back, near her hip, and a scar on her right arm. Her nickname is Christy. She has a slight speech impediment and her teeth are crooked.
Details of Disappearance
Marjorie was last seen at Greenacres Grocery (now Belk's General Store) in her hometown of Greenacres City, Florida on May 27, 1984. She purchased cat food at approximately 3:00 p.m. The business is located just a few hundred feet from her home.

She may have stayed at the store until as late as 6:00 p.m. to play video games, or may have headed to a nearby park after leaving the store. She never returned home and has not been seen again. Her sister realized she was missing after she woke up at 8:30 p.m. She waited thirty minutes, then woke up their mother and told her Marjorie was gone.

Willis Rambo was considered a suspect in Marjorie's case for a time. He lived near her home with his brother, Charles "Chuck" Rambo. Marjorie had visited their house several times, and a witness had seen Charles give Marjorie money. After her disappearance, the Rambo brothers were charged with molesting Marjorie's six-year-old best friend. Authorities realized the girl was being abused when they interviewed her about Marjorie's disappearance.

Police searched the Rambo brothers' house and property after Marjorie went missing, but found no evidence to implicate them in her case. Both men denied any involvement in her disappearance.

Photos of Willis and Charles are posted with this case summary. They each pleaded guilty to lewd assault in the abuse of Marjorie's friend, and were sentenced to ten years' probation. In 1991, Willis was sentenced to four life terms in prison for sexually abusing his two stepdaughters. Charles now lives in Tennessee.

Victor George Wonyetye Jr. was a golf course worker in 1984 and is considered a suspect in Marjorie's case. A photo of him is posted with this case summary. He lived near her residence, he was reportedly seen outside the grocery store the day she disappeared, and he also attended a party in her neighborhood.

He had a criminal record dating back to the 1960s and has been convicted in the past of sexual assaults, among various other offenses. Wonyetye moved to New Hampshire shortly after Marjorie disappeared and is also a suspect in the 1984 disappearance of Tammy Lyn Belanger in that state.

Wonteye was never charged in connection with either child's case and no physical evidence connects him to the disappearances. He maintained his innocence and said he never even met Marjorie. Wonteye was sentenced to 75 years for burglary and indecent exposure in Florida in 1992; at the trial, prison inmates testified that he admitted killing Marjorie and Tammy. He was released from prison in 2012 and died eight months later.

In 2010, authorities named Delbert Mosher was another possible suspect in Marjorie's disappearance. He lived in the area at the time Marjorie disappeared, and was arrested three times for child molestation. He died in a Tennessee prison over twenty years after Marjorie went missing.

William Ferris lived near the home of one of Marjorie's friends at the time of her disappearance. The friend's home was just on the other side of the block from her route to the store, and Marjorie could have reached the house by cutting through yards. The friend wasn't at home that day, but if Marjorie had tried to visit her she would have passed Ferris's house. He was later arrested for child molestation in Virginia.

When questioned about Marjorie's disappearance, Ferris initially denied knowing her. In a later police interview he admitted he did know her, because his wife sometimes babysat for Marjorie's friend. According to Ferris's wife, one day when the two girls were playing together, Ferris said one of them was going to disappear someday. After Marjorie went missing, he said she would never be found. There is no evidence to implicate him in her case, however.

Marjorie's mother moved away after her daughter disappeared, but later moved back into the same house where she lived with Marjorie in 1984. She still lives there and still hopes for answers in her daughter's case. Foul play is suspected in Marjorie's disappearance. Her case remains unsolved.


MEDIA - MARJORIE "CHRISTY" LUNA: Missing from Greenacres City, Florida since 27 May 1984 - Age 8
 
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Jason Futch

Well-known member
Florida 1984 cold-case investigation turns to yard where Christy Luna once played

By Olivia Hitchcock
@ohitchcock
Posted Aug 23, 2019 at 10:29 AMUpdated Aug 23, 2019 at 10:44 AM
Marjorie “Christy” Luna was last seen May 27, 1984, across the street from where investigators dug earlier this month looking for evidence of the missing 8-year-old girl.

GREENACRES — Back in 1984, “Mom and Pop” Martinez’s single-story house at the corner of Swain and Second seemed to entertain a constant stream of children.
There were the three grandchildren who lived there and a dozen more who frequently stopped by the three-bedroom home. And that’s in addition to the neighborhood kids who came to play in the yard, family members recall, including, they say, Marjorie “Christy” Luna.
Thirty-five years after Christy was last seen buying cat food at the store catty-corner from the Martinez home, law enforcement spent five days excavating the small yard where she reportedly once played. The dig has raised the family’s profile on social media, often in ways members say is unfounded and unfair, as rumors about what happened to Christy swirl anew.
At a news conference on Aug. 5, a Monday, Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw said his office received a tip in late May prompting investigators to dig up the yard on the one-tenth-of-an-acre property.
By the afternoon of Aug. 9, crews wrapped up the dig. They found both large bones, identified as animal bones, and small ones, which also appear to be from animals.
However, the sheriff’s office won’t be able to say for certain where the bones came from until a lab at Florida Gulf Coast University examines them.
Bradshaw said the tip that led them to the yard at 265 Swain Blvd. came through social media shortly after his social-media team released a 19-minute documentary on the 35th anniversary of Christy’s disappearance.
Bradshaw called the tip “one of the best and most credible leads that we have got to date to solve this case,” but would not elaborate on who gave them the tip, what exactly it said or how investigators worked to verify it in the two months since they received it.
From Monday morning through Friday afternoon, sheriff’s investigators worked alongside a team of forensic anthropologists from Florida Gulf Coast clearing vegetation outside the home, shoveling dirt and methodically sifting through those piles, bucket by bucket, for any trace of the missing second-grader. On Friday, six members of the Cardinal Newman High School football team helped in the dig, too.
“I think we’re going to bring Christy home,” her mother Jennie Johnson said to reporters Monday across the street from the dig site. “We are going to bring Christy home.”

The investigation continues
Sheriff’s investigators have remained tight-lipped about the specifics of the search. However, a review of property records indicates it likely included a search of the septic tank, which sits on the southeast corner of the property. It appears the tank has been there since Guadalupe and Maria Martinez bought the property in 1977.
About 10 years ago, the couple’s oldest daughter, Maria Ruiz, and her husband opened that tank. They spotted a white, round object about the size of a volleyball at the bottom.
Ruiz recalled the object looking deflated and remembers thinking, “Who would throw a ball down in the sewer?”
They didn’t pull it up. She hadn’t thought much of it until the excavation, she said.
Greenacres building director Michael Grimm said Friday that larger objects can get into a septic tank if the lid has been compromised. For example, he’s seen cases in which a car unknowingly drives over a tank, breaking the top of it.


Current owner Rolando Melillo bought the home in 2009 shortly after that septic-tank discovery. Maria Martinez died months later. Her husband died in 2002.
Melillo never lived in the home, he said. He said he currently rents it to one of the former owners’ grandchildren.
Tammy Dickerson, who has known the family since she was 14 and is married to the couple’s grandson, Ronnie, admits it’s a logical jump between looking for the remains of a missing girl in the yard of a family’s longtime home to questioning the relatives who ventured in and out of it at the time of her disappearance.
What she doesn’t understand is why online postings single out her husband, who was 17 at the time of Christy’s disappearance, and her brother-in-law Donnie, who was 14.
“Detective (William) Springer is asking anyone who knows a Ronnie or Donnie Dickerson to contact him immediately,” numerous public Facebook posts read.
Springer, busy shoveling dirt alongside anthropology students, wouldn’t comment on the social-media postings, and Facebook users who shared those posts said they were instructed not to speak further about them.
As far as Tammy Dickerson knows, no one from the sheriff’s office has reached out to her husband or brother-in-law in regard to the case.


And, she points out, they’re not hard to find.
Ronnie Dickerson’s home address is on his driver’s license, she said.
In a telephone conversation late Friday, the 52-year-old said he’d gladly speak to detectives about the case. He talked to a Greenacres police officer after Christy’s disappearance and mentioned that he saw a white van parked on the south side of the general store days before she vanished. He said that two men in the van tried to lure him inside, saying they were selling electronics.

“That always stuck in my mind,” he said. “That was weird to me.”
But that’s about all the information he could offer about the investigation into the little girl’s disappearance, he said.
He doesn’t recall ever seeing Christy at his grandparents’ home, though he said “the door was always open” there.
Ruiz, however, said she specifically remembers on two occasions seeing Christy playing in her parents’ yard.


As for Ronnie’s younger brother, Donnie Dickerson is finishing a three-year prison sentence in Raiford for burglary and theft. He won’t be out until September, according to Florida Department of Corrections records.
Donnie’s criminal history, mainly theft- and burglary-related offenses, stem from drug addiction, his family said, one that started when he was barely a teenager.
“Pffttt, my little brother,” Ronnie Dickerson said, “for him to be involved in it, I very seriously doubt it.”
Most of Donnie’s life has been spent between drug-rehabilitation centers and jail, his older brother said.
Donnie’s struggle with drugs and run-ins with the law, along with other “family trash,” of which the Dickersons admit there is plenty, are being aired online in light of the excavation.
Tammy Dickerson said all it’s doing is taking away from the search for Christy.

STORY CONTINUES AT THIS LINK: Florida 1984 cold-case investigation turns to yard where Christy Luna once played
 

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