AK EKLUTNA ANNIE: WF, 16-25, found buried along a power line in a heavily wooded area in Eklutna, AK - 17 Jul 1980

Romulus

Well-known member
311UFAK - Unidentified Female

Reconstruction by NCMEC; original 3D rendering, victim's jewelry.

Date of Discovery: July 17, 1980
Location of Discovery: Eklutna, Anchorage Borough, Alaska
Estimated Date of Death: 1979-1980
State of Remains: Skeletal
Cause of Death: Homicide by stabbing

Physical Description
Estimated Age: 16-25 years old
Race: White with possible Native American admixture
Sex: Female
Height: 4'11" to 5'3"
Weight: Unknown
Hair: Light brown with a reddish tint, long.
Eye Color: Unknown
Distinguishing Marks/Features: Small frame.

Identifiers
Dentals: Available.
Fingerprints: Not available.
DNA: Available.

Clothing & Personal Items
Clothing: Red or reddish-brown knee-high high-heeled vinyl boots with a nylon zipper on the side, jeans, a light colored (possibly white, beige, or light gray) sleeveless knit sweater, and a brown leather hip-length jacket.
Jewelry: A wide copper bracelet with a stamped flora design and three turquoise stones. Turquoise and brown shell necklace with a heart pendant and twisted metal bead spacers. Gold-plated twisted metal hoop earrings. White shell ring with a brown inset ring. Gold-plated ladies chain-linked Timex wrist watch with a brown face and white hands.
Additional Personal Items: Salem matches were found in the pocket of the jacket.

Circumstances of Discovery
The victim's remains were found buried along a power line in a heavily wooded area, one mile south of South Eklutna Lake Road near mile post two in Eklutna. She had been stabbed in the back.

In 1984, a local baker named Robert Hansen listed her among the 17 to 21 women he admitted to killing in and around Anchorage between 1971 to 1983. He said she was his first victim, but didn't know her name. Hansen said that she was a topless dancer or a prostitute. He killed her when she tried to escape as he was taking her to his home.

The victim had no identification and could not be matched to a missing persons report. Hansen said the woman might have said she or her family lived in Kodiak. Troopers believe she may have come to Alaska from Washington or California.

She has been dubbed "Eklutna Annie."

Robert Hansen died in prison in 2014.

Investigating Agency(s)
Agency Name: Alaska State Medical Examiner’s Office
Agency Contact Person: Stephen Hoage
Agency Phone Number: 907-334-2200
Agency E-Mail: N/A
Agency Case Number: 04-00106

Agency Name: Anchorage Police Department
Agency Contact Person: N/A
Agency Phone Number: 907-786-8900
Agency E-Mail: N/A
Agency Case Number: 1980-45262

Agency Name: Alaska State Troopers
Agency Contact Person: Det. James Gallen
Agency Phone Number: 907-269-5511
Agency E-Mail: N/A
Agency Case Number: 96-51484

NCIC Case Number: U150004982
NamUs Case Number: 10217
NCMEC Case Number: 1184520

Information Source(s)
NamUs
NCMEC
Wikipedia
Anchorage Police Department
Fairbanks Daily News-Miner Archive
KTVA News Archive


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Akoya

Well-known member
EKLUTNA ANNIE - Robert Hansen victim






An autopsy report concluded the victim had been killed by a stab wound to the back. She was murdered by Robert Hansen, a serial killer who was responsible for murdering as many as 20 other women. Eklutna Annie was buried in a shallow grave, alongside a series of power lines in Eklutna, Anchorage, Alaska.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
.com/alaska-news/article/grisly-legacy-eklutna-annie/2012/07/15/


Grisly legacy of 'Eklutna Annie'

Author: Mike Dunham
Updated: September 29, 2016
Published July 14, 2012

A small bronze plaque, partially buried by sod at the Anchorage Memorial Park Cemetery, marks the grave of one of the most famous murder victims in Alaska history. The plaque doesn't have her real name -- no one knows what that was -- or even the name by which she is best known. And the date on it is probably wrong.

But there lies "Eklutna Annie," said to have been the first victim of serial killer Robert Hanson.

Hanson, an Anchorage baker, admitted to killing 17 women between 1979 and 1984, sometimes taking them to remote locations and hunting them down like wild game. The bloody spree has provided material for several books -- fiction and nonfiction -- episodes of television crime shows, documentaries and an upcoming major film, "The Frozen Ground."

Investigators confirmed the names of 16 of Hanson's victims. (Some believe the total is 21 or more.) But Annie has remained nameless since her remains were uncovered near a remote power line on July 21, 1980.

This year, 32 years and a day after Annie's body was found, Anchorage school teacher Rachel Gregory will portray the deceased woman, standing by her grave and telling visitors what little can be confirmed about Annie's life. Gregory is one of several actors who will depict personages buried at the downtown graveyard in a "Stories at the Cemetery" performance from 6 to 8 p.m. on Sunday, July 22.

The "Stories" event was started last year by volunteer cemetery researchers Bruce and Audrey Kelly and actress/storyteller Linda Benson. Admission is free, though donations are accepted and shared by the performers.

"We were making bets about how many people would show up," said Gregory, who last year portrayed Ada Blackjack, the sole survivor of a disastrous expedition to Wrangel Island in the 1920s. "We figured a couple dozen.

"There must have been a thousand."

Quirky tales

"Stories" builds on long-running annual tours of the cemetery started by the late John Bagoy. Distressed by the deteriorating condition of the graves of Anchorage pioneers, Bagoy threw himself into studying the site, plot by plot. He swept the grounds with a metal detector to uncover tin identification plates, which in some cases were all that was left of the original wood crosses that once marked where coffins were placed.

For "Stories' " inaugural year, Benson and company focused on local celebrities like Blackjack, painter Sydney Laurence's wife Jeanne, and publisher and Native rights advocate Howard Rock. But they also featured the graves of those killed in the notorious Cache Creek murders of 1939.

This year, the repertoire will feature more homicides, including men killed in misunderstandings or love triangles. Jeff Aldrich, a veteran of the Fairbanks Shakespeare Festival who has been performing in "bobrauschenbergamerica" at Cyrano's this month, will assume the role of a detective who comments on Annie and directs visitors to the nearby graves of four of Hanson's other victims.

The Kellys recruited Aldrich.

"It sounded cool to me," he said. "I'm into site-specific work and work that's integral with the community -- and this is both."

Some of this year's tales are more quirky than horrifying. Audrey Kelly (she portrayed Jeanne Laurence last year) will be Myrtle Wendler, the owner of Club 25 and the Wendler Building, said to be the oldest frame structure still standing in Anchorage. "I might give away my secret recipe for the Golden Comet," she said, slipping into character and referring to the club's signature drink. "I never divulged it until my retirement."

Bruce Kelly will be Frank Dorbrandt, a pioneer pilot with an airplane propeller for a grave marker. "You can always tell where the pilots are," Kelly said.

He described Dorbrandt as a cantankerous smuggler who gave federal authorities the fits, "a braggart, self-serving. He worked for all the air carriers but not with any one of them for very long. He was not a team player. But no one ever questioned his ability to fly."

Linda Benson will take the role of Ella Romig, wife of the doctor for whom Romig Hill is named. John Frazier will vamp it up as Wayne Hussy, one of the first openly gay men in town and self-proclaimed "First Empress of Alaska."

No name

Period costumes are key to the show. Aldrich will wear a trench coat and fedora. Gregory will be tarted up in a mini-skirt and netted midriff.

"I'm trying to get the clothes right to the best of my ability," she said.

The real Annie was wearing knee-high, high-heeled boots, a sleeveless knit top, jeans and a brown leather jacket when she died. Hanson told interrogators she was a **** dancer or a prostitute -- the same thing he said about all his victims.

Hanson didn't know her name but thought she might have been from Kodiak. (Police dubbed her "Eklutna" because of where she was found, not because she was thought to be from the village.)

A Daily News article on the 20th anniversary of her death described how Hanson drove her out of town in his truck, chased her when she ran and grabbed her by her long hair. She pulled a knife from her purse. He took the knife and stabbed her in the back.

"It was gruesome way to die," Gregory said. "It's a sad story but a good awareness tool, a way to talk about the way some people still treat women."

Annie was thought to have died a year before electrical workers found her remains. There was little left to identify her. The Alaska State Troopers' missing persons website says Annie was short, between 4 feet 11 inches and 5 feet 3 inches tall. And young, in her late teens or early 20s. She was "possibly white with American Indian/Native mix" and had "light brown to reddish-blond" hair.

Hanson was convicted and sentenced to 461 years plus life. He is in Spring Creek prison in Seward.

Annie was laid to rest in the Anchorage cemetery, then exhumed and relocated -- her third burial -- when the area where she was originally interred was designated for infants.

Her humble, relocated marker now sits between two elegant headstones under a massive blue spruce flanked by flowering lilacs. The plaque on Plot 21, Row 17, Section 14 of the cemetery is hard to find. It gives visitors no clue as to her place among the unsolved mysteries of Alaska's past. It contains just four words.

"Jane Doe

Died 1980."

Reach Mike Dunham at mdunham@adn.com or 257-4332.

By MIKE DUNHAM

Anchorage Daily News
 

Akoya

Well-known member
http://unidentified.wikia.com/wiki/Eklutna_Annie


Eklutna Annie

Eklutna Annie was a young woman who was murdered by Robert Hansen. Her remains were found buried in Eklutna, Alaska near telephone wires.

Eklutna Annie wore many pieces of distinct, handmade jewelry. Some were made from metal and shells and contained stones such as turquoise. She had been stabbed in the back, which Robert Hansen admitted to doing after she attempted to escape from his car after he was taking her home (it is unknown if she went willingly or was abducted). He stated she was either a **** dancer or a prostitute.

Along with Horseshoe Harriet, she is one of two unidentified victims of Hansen, who died in 2014.








Eklutna Annie Cscr-featured



Sex Female
Race White
Location Eklutna, Alaska
Found July 17, 1980
Unidentified for 38 years
Postmortem interval 1 month - 1 year
Body condition Skeletal
Age approximation 16 - 25
Height approximation 4'11 to 5'3
Weight approximation N/A
Cause of death Stabbing
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eklutna_Annie

"Eklutna Annie"



Reconstructions of Eklutna Annie
Born Approx. 1954–1963
Status Unidentified for 38 years, 7 months and 11 days
Died c. November 1979 – June 1980 (aged 16 – 25)[1]
Cause of death Homicide by stabbing
Body discovered July 21, 1980
Eklutna, Anchorage, Alaska
Known for Unidentified victim of homicide
Height Between 4 ft 11 in (1.50 m)
and 5 ft 3 in (1.60 m) [2]
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eklutna_Annie

Eklutna Annie is the informal name given to an unidentified murder victim discovered in 1980 in Eklutna, Anchorage, Alaska. An autopsy report concluded that she had been killed by a stab wound to the back.

She was murdered by Robert Hansen, a serial killer who was responsible for murdering as many as 20 other women. Later in the year, the remains of **** dancer Joanne Messina were found in the same area.

"Horseshoe Harriet", another unidentified woman, is believed to have also been one of Hansen's victims.

The skeletalized remains of Eklutna Annie were discovered buried in a shallow grave, alongside a series of power lines, on July 21, 1980.

She wore several articles of clothing, including a knitted sleeveless shirt, a leather coat containing matches in a pocket, and knee-high boots. The victim was also wearing several pieces of jewelry:

An apparently handmade metal bracelet containing three turquoise stones
A copper necklace containing shell beads
A pendant heart

Jewelry worn by Eklutna Annie.
A metal wristwatch consisting of circular links with a brown watch face
A ring carved from shell
Metal earrings
Eklutna Annie was most likely white, but may have had a degree of Native American heritage. Her hair color ranged from light brown to strawberry-blond.



Robert Hansen, a serial killer who resided in the area, admitted in 1984 that he was responsible for the victim's death. He claimed that she was either a dancer from a local bar or a prostitute, and that she was his first murder victim, adding that she had been murdered in the fall or early winter of 1979.

Hansen admitted that he had stabbed this decedent as she attempted to escape from his vehicle, when he tried to transport her to his residence, Hansen said he believed she was from Kodiak, Alaska, and that immediately prior to his murdering her, as the woman struggled against his efforts to overpower her, she had hysterically screamed, "You're going to kill me!"

Eklutna Annie is still unidentified, despite the fact that her face has been reconstructed in both 3-D and 2-D. Several missing women are believed to have also been murdered by Hansen.

Roxane Easland, Karen Evan, Megan Emerick, and Teresa Davis have been ruled out as possible identities of Eklutna Annie.

Hansen was sentenced to 461 years in prison without the possibility of parole for her murder and three others. He died in prison in August 2014.

The remains of Eklutna Annie are interred at the Anchorage Memorial Park Cemetery under a marker reading "Jane Doe / Died 1980".

The Frozen Ground, starring Nicolas Cage and John Cusack, was dedicated to Hansen's victims
 

Akoya

Well-known member
http://www.peninsulaclarion.com/stories/022103/ala_022103ala0160001.shtml

Friday, February 21, 2003

Troopers try to identify victim of serial killer


ANCHORAGE (AP) -- Alaska State Troopers are making another try at identifying a murdered woman nicknamed ''Eklutna Annie,'' more than 20 years after her decomposed body was found buried along a power line outside Eklutna.

The woman, believed to be a white brunette in her 20s, was found on July 21, 1980, by electric workers repairing the line. She had no identification and could not be matched to a missing persons report. Troopers believe she may have come to Alaska from Washington or California.

Forensic experts said the woman appeared to have been dead about a year.

In 1984, a local baker named Robert Hansen listed her among the 17 women he admitted killing in and around Anchorage. He said she was his first victim, but didn't know her name. She was a **** dancer or a prostitute, he told troopers in his confession. He picked her up in town, told her he lived in Muldoon and was taking her to his home.

But when he continued past Muldoon Road out of town, the woman said no and tried to get out of his pickup, so he pulled a gun on her.

''I just pointed the gun and I tell her, I says, 'Now look, if you do exactly what I tell you and don't give me any problem whatsoever, there's going to be no -- you won't get hurt any way, shape or form,''' Hansen told troopers.

But the truck got stuck in mud. The woman helped Hansen maneuver onto tractable ground, but when he told her to get out for a minute, she ran, he said. He caught her by the hair and claims she pulled a knife from her purse. He overpowered her, he said, and used the knife to stab her in the back.

Hansen said the woman might have said she or her family lived in Kodiak.

Troopers were not convinced the woman was Hansen's first victim, but her death occurred early enough in his murder career that he left her jewelry on her body when he buried her.

Troopers are hoping someone will recognize her jewelry. None of it is valuable or particularly distinctive, but a silver cuff bracelet with polished stones may be handmade.

Once Hansen became a more experienced killer, he began keeping his victims' jewelry. A bag of such jewelry was found in his home after investigators came to suspect him in the disappearances of dancers and prostitutes from pipeline-era Anchorage.

Hansen, now in his 60s, is in Spring Creek prison in Seward, serving 461 years plus life.

When found, Annie was wearing knee-high, reddish-brown, high-heeled boots, jeans, a sleeveless knit top and a brown leather jacket.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-alaska-remains-idUSKBN0GZ2CU20140904

SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

Victim of Alaska serial killer Robert Hansen exhumed for DNA tests

(Reuters) - The remains of a young woman murdered 30 years ago by Alaska’s most notorious serial killer has been exhumed in the hopes of finally confirming her identity, officials said Thursday.

The woman was one of 17 victims killed in the 1970s and 1980s by Robert Hansen, who died in prison last month. His victims, many of them prostitutes, were kidnapped and then released in the wilderness where he hunted them down like game, police said.

Two of Hansen’s victims have never been identified, authorities said.

On Wednesday, the state medical examiner’s exhumed the remains of one of those women, known to investigators as “Horseshoe Harriet” because her body was discovered in 1984 near Horseshoe Lake, said Jason Grenn, a spokesman for the Department of Health and Social Services.

He said the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, which paid for the exhumation, will perform DNA testing and work up a facial reconstruction.

“With the new information they have, they are hoping to finally get an identity on her,” he said.

Forensic and DNA experts from across the country will assist in the identification process, said Dr. Angela Williamson, who leads the Unknown Victim Identification Team at the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

“The remains will undergo multiple forensic tests,” she said. “A forensic anthropologist will more accurately determine this girl’s age range.”

DNA from the remains can be cross-referenced against DNA databases to try to link her to a family member, Williamson said.

Hansen’s other unidentified victim, “Eklutna Annie” has already undergone facial reconstruction but so far, her identity still remains a mystery, Williamson said.

“Annie” was discovered in Eklutna, Alaska, and her remains are buried at the Anchorage Memorial Park Cemetery, under a header reading “Jane Doe: Died 1980,” Grenn said.

Hansen was convicted in 1984 and sentenced to 461 years in prison. He died in August at the age of 75.

Reporting by Victoria Cavaliere in Seattle; Editing by Scott Malone

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
 

Akoya

Well-known member
https://www.houstonchronicle.com/ne...e-tells-tale-of-Alaska-murder-her-3725353.php

'Eklutna Annie' tells tale of Alaska murder - her own

MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS July 21, 2012


Rachel Gregory will portray "Eklutna Annie," said to be the first of serial killer Robert Hansen's 17 victims, and Jeff Aldrich will portray a detective in this year's tour of notable cemetery residents in Anchorage.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A small bronze plaque, partially buried by sod at the Anchorage Memorial Park Cemetery, marks the grave of one of Alaska's most famous murder victims. It doesn't have her real name - no one knows what it was - or even the one by which she is best known. And the date is probably wrong.

But there lies "Eklutna Annie," said to have been the first victim of serial killer Robert Hansen.

Hansen, an Anchorage baker, admitted to killing 17 women between 1979 and 1984, sometimes taking them to remote locations and hunting them like wild game. The slayings have inspired several books - fiction and nonfiction - television shows, documentaries and an upcoming film, "The Frozen Ground."

Investigators confirmed the names of 16 of Hansen's victims. (Some believe he killed 21 or more.) But Annie has remained nameless since her remains were uncovered near a remote power line on July 21, 1980.

This year, 32 years and a day after Annie's body was found, Anchorage schoolteacher Rachel Gregory will portray the deceased woman, standing by her grave and telling visitors what little can be confirmed about Annie's life. Gregory is one of several actors who will depict people buried at the downtown graveyard in a "Stories at the Cemetery" performance.

The "Stories" event was started last year by volunteer cemetery researchers Bruce and Audrey Kelly and actress/storyteller Linda Benson.

"We were making bets about how many people would show up," said Gregory, who last year portrayed Ada Blackjack, the sole survivor of a disastrous expedition to Wrangel Island in the 1920s. "We figured a couple dozen. There must have been a thousand."

Began as cemetery tour

"Stories" builds on long-running annual tours of the cemetery started by the late John Bagoy. Distressed by the deteriorating condition of the graves of Anchorage pioneers, Bagoy swept the grounds with a metal detector to uncover tin identification plates, which in some cases were all that was left of the original wood crosses.

For the inaugural year of "Stories," Benson and company focused on local celebrities such as Blackjack; painter Sydney Laurence's wife, Jeanne; and publisher and Native rights advocate Howard Rock.

But they also featured the graves of those killed in the notorious Cache Creek murders of 1939.

This year, the repertoire will feature more homicides, including men killed in misunderstandings or love triangles. Jeff Aldrich, a veteran of the Fairbanks Shakespeare Festival, will assume the role of a detective who comments on Annie and directs visitors to the nearby graves of four of Hansen's other victims.

The Kellys recruited Aldrich.

"It sounded cool to me," he said. "I'm into site-specific work and work that's integral with the community - and this is both."

Period costumes are key to the show. Aldrich will wear a trench coat and fedora. Gregory will be tarted up in a mini-skirt and netted midriff.

"I'm trying to get the clothes right to the best of my ability," she said.

The real Annie was wearing knee-high, high-heeled boots, a sleeveless knit top, jeans and a brown leather jacket when she died. Hansen told police she was a **** dancer or a prostitute - the same thing he said about all his victims.

Hansen didn't know her name but thought she might have been from Kodiak. (Police dubbed her "Eklutna" because of where she was found, not because she was thought to be from the village.)

An Anchorage Daily News article on the 20th anniversary of her death told how Hansen drove her out of town in his truck, chased her when she ran and grabbed her by her long hair.

She pulled a knife from her purse. He took it and stabbed her in the back.

"It's a sad story, but a good awareness tool," said Gregory, "a way to talk about the way some people still treat women."

Little left for identity

Annie was thought to have died a year before electrical workers found her remains.

There was little left to identify her. The Alaska State Troopers' missing persons website describes Annie as short, between 4 feet 11 inches and 5 feet 3 inches tall.

And she was young, in her late teens or early 20s. She was "possibly white with American Indian/Native mix" and had "light brown to reddish-blond" hair.

Hansen was convicted and sentenced to 461 years plus life. He is in Spring Creek prison in Seward.

Annie's humble marker sits between two elegant headstones under a massive blue spruce flanked by flowering lilacs.

The plaque on Plot 21, Row 17, Section 14 of the cemetery is hard to find. It gives visitors no clue as to her place among Alaska's unsolved mysteries. It contains just four words.

"Jane Doe

Died 1980."
 

SheWhoMustNotBeNamed

Administrator
Staff member
A newer reconstruction from NCMEC.

1600017497494.png
 

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