Discussion on Serial Killers, Spree Killers, Mass Killers, And single event killers.

GrandmaBear

Deputized Emu Slayer/Horse Thief Hunter
Well I just want to say hello first! You could have made this just serial killers maybe you want to do that? Don't change it on my account.

I am not up on facts on most these days but have read of many in detail. Two to me are first, BTK. That man got his jollies and could see it, and was married with children AND stopped and started up again. He could not resist taunting LE.

Dahmer I guess both being from WI and it "seemed" he actually tried to let them figure out what made him tick without the games some of them play. Not saying he did and was not playing games but he shared quite a bit...

Are they born this way or do they go this way due to life events or lack of something? I feel both can be the case...
 

GarAndMo39

Not a Sheeple!
Hi @Mel70 & all,
great thread! I'll have to think about which serial killers I'm most interested in- one that comes to mind immediately is Audrey Marie Hilley:
Technically, she was only proven to have killed her husband, but she almost succeeded in killing her daughter, and she poisoned many others to varying degrees. Her story would be scoffed at were it fiction.
In re: the death penalty: I couldn't impose it myself (as in being on a jury, etc.), because I don't want to be responsible for anyone being killed- but that's just my ethical feeling. I have no problem with others' beliefs. Oh, also the idea of an innocent person being executed is very troublesome to me, as well.
 

GarAndMo39

Not a Sheeple!
Oh, another serial killer that always gets to me is Michael Swango:
The main thing that gets to me about Swango is that he was a doctor, and time and time again, patients & hospital staff reported him to doctors and university higher-ups; they ALL ignored the reports because, IMO, they didn't want their precious university to look bad, and they thought they were smarter than lowly nurses & patients. Recommended reading: Blind Eye by James B. Stewart:
1602195795630.png
A medical thriller from Pulitzer Prize–winning author James B. Stewart about serial killer doctor Michael Swango and the medical community that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities.

No one could believe that the handsome young doctor might be a serial killer. Wherever he was hired—in Ohio, Illinois, New York, South Dakota—Michael Swango at first seemed the model physician. Then his patients began dying under suspicious circumstances.

At once a gripping read and a hard-hitting look at the inner workings of the American medical system, Blind Eye describes a professional hierarchy where doctors repeatedly accept the word of fellow physicians over that of nurses, hospital employees, and patients—even as horrible truths begin to emerge. With the prodigious investigative reporting that has defined his Pulitzer Prize–winning career, James B. Stewart has tracked down survivors, relatives of victims, and shaken coworkers to unearth the evidence that may finally lead to Swango’s conviction.

Combining meticulous research with spellbinding prose, Stewart has written a shocking chronicle of a psychopathic doctor and of the medical establishment that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities. <snip>
 

Mel70

Blank
Hi @Mel70 & all,
great thread! I'll have to think about which serial killers I'm most interested in- one that comes to mind immediately is Audrey Marie Hilley:
Technically, she was only proven to have killed her husband, but she almost succeeded in killing her daughter, and she poisoned many others to varying degrees. Her story would be scoffed at were it fiction.
In re: the death penalty: I couldn't impose it myself (as in being on a jury, etc.), because I don't want to be responsible for anyone being killed- but that's just my ethical feeling. I have no problem with others' beliefs. Oh, also the idea of an innocent person being executed is very troublesome to me, as well.
I'll have to read up on this case. I could impose death.
 

Mel70

Blank
Oh, another serial killer that always gets to me is Michael Swango:
The main thing that gets to me about Swango is that he was a doctor, and time and time again, patients & hospital staff reported him to doctors and university higher-ups; they ALL ignored the reports because, IMO, they didn't want their precious university to look bad, and they thought they were smarter than lowly nurses & patients. Recommended reading: Blind Eye by James B. Stewart:
View attachment 7213
A medical thriller from Pulitzer Prize–winning author James B. Stewart about serial killer doctor Michael Swango and the medical community that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities.

No one could believe that the handsome young doctor might be a serial killer. Wherever he was hired—in Ohio, Illinois, New York, South Dakota—Michael Swango at first seemed the model physician. Then his patients began dying under suspicious circumstances.

At once a gripping read and a hard-hitting look at the inner workings of the American medical system, Blind Eye describes a professional hierarchy where doctors repeatedly accept the word of fellow physicians over that of nurses, hospital employees, and patients—even as horrible truths begin to emerge. With the prodigious investigative reporting that has defined his Pulitzer Prize–winning career, James B. Stewart has tracked down survivors, relatives of victims, and shaken coworkers to unearth the evidence that may finally lead to Swango’s conviction.

Combining meticulous research with spellbinding prose, Stewart has written a shocking chronicle of a psychopathic doctor and of the medical establishment that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities. <snip>
That's an interesting topic. Why do these Doctors and Nurses kill?
It wasn't out of mercy. But just killing. Why?.I don't put "Dr. Kevorkian" in this category. I truly feel he thought he was giving them mercy and had no malice.
 

Mel70

Blank
Well I just want to say hello first! You could have made this just serial killers maybe you want to do that? Don't change it on my account.

I am not up on facts on most these days but have read of many in detail. Two to me are first, BTK. That man got his jollies and could see it, and was married with children AND stopped and started up again. He could not resist taunting LE.

Dahmer I guess both being from WI and it "seemed" he actually tried to let them figure out what made him tick without the games some of them play. Not saying he did and was not playing games but he shared quite a bit...

Are they born this way or do they go this way due to life events or lack of something? I feel both can be the case...
Yeah B.T.K. creepy. The Polaroids are very disturbing that he took of himself. So arrogant. Infuriating. Dahmer. Yes he took responsibility for what he did. He did show warning signs at an early age. Animal abuse. Picking up road kill. His mother struggled with mental illness and had been hospitalized on occasion. He was already an alcoholic in High School. He was on the path to destruction and killed his first victim at 18.
 

Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
View attachment 7214

To start. I have always found Serial Killers fascinating. What makes them do what they do?. I know I am not the only one. This is the place to talk about it. I'll start. Who do you find the most fascinating and why?.
I think that the most fascinating serial killer has been Ted Bundy. I think that he is the most fascinating because he seemed the most "normal" of all of them. Because I happen to have been married to somebody who appeared to be somebody that in the end they weren't, I'm always intrigued by people who can fake it that well. Scary scary scary!
 

Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
Do you believe in the Death Penalty?
Why or why not?
If you do, Is there anyone you believe should not have been executed?.
I do believe in the death penalty in the most heinous of crimes. Like in the case of any serial killer. And I think that the execution should be swift.

If there's ever a shadow of a doubt that someone killed, then I don't think the death penalty should be applied. As much as the McStay family deserves justice and that the person who killed them should get the death penalty, I don't think that the person that's been accused of their murder is a "beyond a shadow of a doubt case" and should probably get life. Just my personal opinion.
 

Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
Good thread idea 🙌
The intriguing part for me is the criminal psyche. Why do they do it? What drives them? What events lead them to have such desires?
exactly! And they can't stop thinking about it. That's what gets me! They're walking around like their normal and yet in their minds they're thinking of this heinous world that they're fantasizing about.
 

Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
Oh, another serial killer that always gets to me is Michael Swango:
The main thing that gets to me about Swango is that he was a doctor, and time and time again, patients & hospital staff reported him to doctors and university higher-ups; they ALL ignored the reports because, IMO, they didn't want their precious university to look bad, and they thought they were smarter than lowly nurses & patients. Recommended reading: Blind Eye by James B. Stewart:
View attachment 7213
A medical thriller from Pulitzer Prize–winning author James B. Stewart about serial killer doctor Michael Swango and the medical community that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities.

No one could believe that the handsome young doctor might be a serial killer. Wherever he was hired—in Ohio, Illinois, New York, South Dakota—Michael Swango at first seemed the model physician. Then his patients began dying under suspicious circumstances.

At once a gripping read and a hard-hitting look at the inner workings of the American medical system, Blind Eye describes a professional hierarchy where doctors repeatedly accept the word of fellow physicians over that of nurses, hospital employees, and patients—even as horrible truths begin to emerge. With the prodigious investigative reporting that has defined his Pulitzer Prize–winning career, James B. Stewart has tracked down survivors, relatives of victims, and shaken coworkers to unearth the evidence that may finally lead to Swango’s conviction.

Combining meticulous research with spellbinding prose, Stewart has written a shocking chronicle of a psychopathic doctor and of the medical establishment that chose to turn a blind eye on his criminal activities. <snip>
That is terrifying to think that a doctor that you're trusting to save your life is actually wanting to take it.
 

Kimster

Let's Find Michael Bryson!
Staff member
Yeah B.T.K. creepy. The Polaroids are very disturbing that he took of himself. So arrogant. Infuriating. Dahmer. Yes he took responsibility for what he did. He did show warning signs at an early age. Animal abuse. Picking up road kill. His mother struggled with mental illness and had been hospitalized on occasion. He was already an alcoholic in High School. He was on the path to destruction and killed his first victim at 18.
Did you know that I did a refinance for Dahmer's mother? I only spoke to her on the phone on occasion, but she seemed really nice. My appraiser friend said that her house was very nice and that she had a picture of her son on the mantelpiece just like any other mother.
 

Mel70

Blank
Did you know that I did a refinance for Dahmer's mother? I only spoke to her on the phone on occasion, but she seemed really nice. My appraiser friend said that her house was very nice and that she had a picture of her son on the mantelpiece just like any other mother.
Yes. I remember you saying that. I don't blame her at all. It's just that Mental Illness can passed down and could have played a factor.
 

Mel70

Blank
I think that the most fascinating serial killer has been Ted Bundy. I think that he is the most fascinating because he seemed the most "normal" of all of them. Because I happen to have been married to somebody who appeared to be somebody that in the end they weren't, I'm always intrigued by people who can fake it that well. Scary scary scary!
I'm so sorry you had to go through what sounds like Hell for you. That must have been awful. What a :censored:
 

GrandmaBear

Deputized Emu Slayer/Horse Thief Hunter
Do you believe in the Death Penalty?
Why or why not?
If you do, Is there anyone you believe should not have been executed?.
I believe in it but I draw back at wanting to be the one to give it as a jury member or hit the switch so to speak... I am not sure in that or those situations how I would feel. Just being honest, I would like to say I could no problem in the right case but actually being in that situation would be a very serious consideration. I actually root for it in some cases, but like Gar, I would not like being the one responsible for the decision. I do know I would feel it truly would depend on the sheer amount of proof and certainty for me as well, I don't think I could hand it out in just any case. Beyond a reasonable doubt is one thing with regard to prison, but I think I would want to be even more certain than that if handing down death.

It bothers me when those deservedly get it with enough proof but then just sit on death row for decades and it is not carried out anyhow in many of the states that have it. Some would say that is due to appeals, I would say it also ties to $$$.

All jmo.
 

GrandmaBear

Deputized Emu Slayer/Horse Thief Hunter
That's an interesting topic. Why do these Doctors and Nurses kill?
It wasn't out of mercy. But just killing. Why?.I don't put "Dr. Kevorkian" in this category. I truly feel he thought he was giving them mercy and had no malice.
A "god complex" comes to mind with them but that is just a term and far too simple.

I wonder did they choose the career to be able to kill in this way or did they choose the career and then went onto later changing and wanting to kill...? I suppose no two are the same...

They seem a bit different than the serial killer who picks up random hitchhikers for instance and I wonder if the motives are different...
 

Mel70

Blank
I believe in it but I draw back at wanting to be the one to give it as a jury member or hit the switch so to speak... I am not sure in that or those situations how I would feel. Just being honest, I would like to say I could no problem in the right case but actually being in that situation would be a very serious consideration. I actually root for it in some cases, but like Gar, I would not like being the one responsible for the decision. I do know I would feel it truly would depend on the sheer amount of proof and certainty for me as well, I don't think I could hand it out in just any case. Beyond a reasonable doubt is one thing with regard to prison, but I think I would want to be even more certain than that if handing down death.

It bothers me when those deservedly get it with enough proof but then just sit on death row for decades and it is not carried out anyhow in many of the states that have it. Some would say that is due to appeals, I would say it also ties to $$$.

All jmo.
I don't think it has anything to do with money at all. I don't see how it could. It cost money to keep them alive. It is the appeals which is ridiculous. Some end up dying of natural causes before death can be carried out. Their victims didn't get appeals. Really makes me angry.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
2,155
Messages
89,662
Members
462
Latest member
LookingforSabrina
Top