BREAKING! BREAKING NEWS! IDENTIFIED! *General Information*

The Coffeenator

Well-known member
Jellico Jane Doe has been identified as Tracy Sue Walker.

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In April 1985, skeletal remains were found in the Big Wheel Gap area of Elk Valley in Campbell County. Forensic anthropologists determined that the skeletal remains were those of a white female, likely between the age of 10 and 15. However, investigators could not determine her identity, and she became affectionately known as "Baby Girl". In 2007, a sample of her remains was submitted to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification (UNTCHI) in hopes of identifying the victim. A DNA profile was developed for the victim and entered into the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) as well as the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System in hopes that she would eventually be identified. She was logged in NamUs as UP1577.

In 2013, a TBI agent and intelligence analyst revisited the case and began searching for new leads regarding the girl’s identity. It would be nine more years before they received a break in the case. In 2022, working with the University of Tennessee Anthropology Department, a sample of the child’s remains was sent to Othram. The skeletal remains had failed attempts at testing with other laboratories due to age and degradation of the remains. Othram scientists used advanced genome filtering and other techniques to develop a suitable DNA extract and then used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to produce a genealogical profile for the unknown child. The casework was funded by Carla Davis and Carla additionally led the genealogical research effort to produce investigative leads.

In June, Othram provided a possible relative connected to the child who was living in Indiana. Using that information, a TBI intelligence analyst located potential family members in the Lafayette, Indiana area. A TBI agent made contact with those individuals and confirmed they had a family member go missing from that area in 1978. With the assistance of the Lafayette, Indiana Police Department, agents were able to obtain familial DNA standards for possible siblings of the girl, which were submitted to the TBI Crime Lab in Nashville for entry into CODIS.

In August 2022, UNTCHI confirmed that "Baby Girl" was Tracy Sue Walker, born June 2, 1963. Tracy went missing from the Lafayette, Indiana, area in 1978. Now, TBI Special Agents hope the public can help provide information that may help determine the circumstances leading to Tracy Sue Walker’s death and how she ended up in Campbell County. If you have information about this case or any knowledge about individuals Tracy may have been with before her death, please call 1-800-TBI-FIND.



Tracy Sue Walker's thread as Jellico Jane Doe:
 

Mel70

I miss you Oreo.
Why did her daughter wait until this summer to file a missing persons report when her mother went missing in 1983?. The daughter is at least 40 now. It says she was a toddler when her mother went missing. Her body was found in 1985, And this could have been solved sooner. Say when the daughter was a late teen or early twenties.
 

Mel70

I miss you Oreo.
Jellico Jane Doe has been identified as Tracy Sue Walker.

View attachment 15954

In April 1985, skeletal remains were found in the Big Wheel Gap area of Elk Valley in Campbell County. Forensic anthropologists determined that the skeletal remains were those of a white female, likely between the age of 10 and 15. However, investigators could not determine her identity, and she became affectionately known as "Baby Girl". In 2007, a sample of her remains was submitted to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification (UNTCHI) in hopes of identifying the victim. A DNA profile was developed for the victim and entered into the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS) as well as the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System in hopes that she would eventually be identified. She was logged in NamUs as UP1577.

In 2013, a TBI agent and intelligence analyst revisited the case and began searching for new leads regarding the girl’s identity. It would be nine more years before they received a break in the case. In 2022, working with the University of Tennessee Anthropology Department, a sample of the child’s remains was sent to Othram. The skeletal remains had failed attempts at testing with other laboratories due to age and degradation of the remains. Othram scientists used advanced genome filtering and other techniques to develop a suitable DNA extract and then used Forensic-Grade Genome Sequencing® to produce a genealogical profile for the unknown child. The casework was funded by Carla Davis and Carla additionally led the genealogical research effort to produce investigative leads.

In June, Othram provided a possible relative connected to the child who was living in Indiana. Using that information, a TBI intelligence analyst located potential family members in the Lafayette, Indiana area. A TBI agent made contact with those individuals and confirmed they had a family member go missing from that area in 1978. With the assistance of the Lafayette, Indiana Police Department, agents were able to obtain familial DNA standards for possible siblings of the girl, which were submitted to the TBI Crime Lab in Nashville for entry into CODIS.

In August 2022, UNTCHI confirmed that "Baby Girl" was Tracy Sue Walker, born June 2, 1963. Tracy went missing from the Lafayette, Indiana, area in 1978. Now, TBI Special Agents hope the public can help provide information that may help determine the circumstances leading to Tracy Sue Walker’s death and how she ended up in Campbell County. If you have information about this case or any knowledge about individuals Tracy may have been with before her death, please call 1-800-TBI-FIND.



Tracy Sue Walker's thread as Jellico Jane Doe:
Wow. Missing 1978. Body found 1985. And this long to identify her with advancements in DNA and other technology. But I am glad she is no longer a Doe and has her name back. Rest in peace "Tracy Sue". I hope they can also find your killer. They need to pay for what they did to you.
 

Guess Who

Well-known member
Why did her daughter wait until this summer to file a missing persons report when her mother went missing in 1983?. The daughter is at least 40 now. It says she was a toddler when her mother went missing. Her body was found in 1985, And this could have been solved sooner. Say when the daughter was a late teen or early twenties.
Sounds like she didn't know there wasn't a report until she went in to inquire about it. Better question is why didn't adult at the time she went missing report her as missing. Who raised the daughter? Sure seems that person would have placed a report unless it was the person that had something to do with her disappearing in the first place. That same person could have very well told the daughter they filed one and this is when she found out they didn't.
 

Guess Who

Well-known member
Sounds like she didn't know there wasn't a report until she went in to inquire about it. Better question is why didn't adult at the time she went missing report her as missing. Who raised the daughter? Sure seems that person would have placed a report unless it was the person that had something to do with her disappearing in the first place. That same person could have very well told the daughter they filed one and this is when she found out they didn't.
Here's a story from KCPD themselves
 

Mel70

I miss you Oreo.
Sounds like she didn't know there wasn't a report until she went in to inquire about it. Better question is why didn't adult at the time she went missing report her as missing. Who raised the daughter? Sure seems that person would have placed a report unless it was the person that had something to do with her disappearing in the first place. That same person could have very well told the daughter they filed one and this is when she found out they didn't.
Great points. I admit I had tunnel vision.
 

Mel70

I miss you Oreo.
That's my main question. This case is local to me. Until recently (five years ago or so?) they had her listed as white also. She possibly could have been identified much, much earlier if they hadn't done that.
Yeah. As you know different races have different skull features. Just like when a skeleton is found in it's entirety and they say they can't determine sex. The skull usually can. And the pelvic bones between sexes are so different. I know there are exceptions, But I have to wonder how hard they really try sometimes.
 

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